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Do computers know more about fishing than we do?


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  • Super User

I'm a computer geek and retired software developer.  I've seen a lot of changes since I wrote my first program in 1980.   The new frontier is artifical intelligence and the latest rage is a system called ChatGPT.  It's a system that will generate text on any subject you choose based on your input.  It's the most amazing new technology I've seen in a long time.  I sat down with ChatGPT to discuss bass fishing.  Here are the results.  Tell me what you think.

 

Me> What is the best way for an angler to locate largemouth bass?
 
ChatGPT> The best way for an angler to locate largemouth bass is to fish in areas where there is plenty of cover for the fish to hide, such as around logs, rocks, weed beds, and in the shade of overhanging trees or bushes. Bass are also commonly found near drop-offs or other changes in depth, as well as around structures such as boat docks, bridges, and dams. Additionally, anglers can look for signs of fish activity, such as surface disturbance or ripples, to help pinpoint the location of bass.


Me> What is the best type of fishing line to used when bass fishing?

 

ChatGPT>The best type of fishing line to use when bass fishing depends on the specific fishing scenario and the angler's personal preference. However, some of the most popular types of fishing line for bass fishing include:
-Monofilament: Monofilament line is made from a single strand of nylon and is known for its flexibility and sensitivity. It is a good choice for beginners because it is easy to handle and is available in a wide range of strengths and diameters.
-Fluorocarbon: Fluorocarbon line is made from a synthetic material that is virtually invisible underwater, which can be an advantage when fishing in clear water or around wary fish. It is also known for its high abrasion resistance, making it a good choice for fishing around heavy cover.
-Braided: Braid fishing line is made from multiple strands of high-strength fibers, and is known for its high sensitivity, low stretch, and high abrasion resistance. Braid is a good choice when fishing in heavy cover, deep water or around large fish.
-Co-polymer: Co-polymer line is a combination of monofilament and fluorocarbon, which offers the advantages of both materials. It is more sensitive than monofilament, more abrasion resistant than fluorocarbon and is less visible than fluorocarbon in water.
Ultimately, the best type of fishing line for bass fishing will depend on the specific fishing scenario, the size and species of fish, and the angler's personal preference. It is always recommended to try different types of fishing line and see what works best for you in specific situations.

 

Me> What is the best bass fishing lake in Tennessee?

 

ChatGPT> There are many great bass fishing lakes in Tennessee, but some of the most popular and well-known include:
Chickamauga Lake: This lake is located on the Tennessee River near Chattanooga and is known for its large population of largemouth and smallmouth bass. It is also home to many bass tournaments throughout the year.
Douglas Lake: Located in the eastern part of the state, Douglas Lake is known for its excellent smallmouth bass fishing and it's also home to several bass fishing tournaments.
Old Hickory Lake: This lake is located near Nashville and is known for its excellent largemouth bass fishing, as well as its convenient location close to the city.
Nickajack Lake: This lake is located in the southern part of the state and is known for its excellent smallmouth bass fishing, as well as its scenic beauty.
Norris Lake: This lake is located in the eastern part of the state and is known for its excellent smallmouth and largemouth bass fishing. It is also known for its clear waters, which can make it ideal for sight-fishing.
Ultimately, the best bass fishing lake in Tennessee will depend on the angler's personal preference and the time of year. Each of these lakes and many others have different characteristics, fishing conditions and different sizes of fish, it's always a good idea to check with the local fishing reports and talk to local guides or the park rangers for their recommendations.

 

Me> How do you fish a Texas rig?

 

ChatGPT> The Texas rig is a popular and versatile rigging method for fishing soft plastic baits, such as worms, lizards, and crawfish, for largemouth and smallmouth bass. Here is a general overview of how to fish a Texas rig:
Start by selecting a soft plastic bait, such as a worm or lizard, that is appropriate for the size and species of fish you are targeting.
Thread the plastic bait onto a hook that is appropriate for the size of the bait, such as a 4/0 or 5/0 wide gap hook. The hook should have a "wide gap" so that it can accommodate the size of the soft plastic bait.
Insert the hook point into the head of the bait, and then push the hook through the body of the bait until the point emerges out the other end.
Next, take a small sinker, such as a bullet weight, and thread it onto the fishing line, above the hook. This will help to keep the bait on the bottom, where the bass are likely to be holding.
Once the sinker is in place, tie a knot in the fishing line to secure it to the hook.
Finally, cast the rig out into the water and allow it to sink to the bottom. Once the rig is on the bottom, you can retrieve it by slowly reeling in the slack line, with occasional twitches of the rod tip to make the bait appear more lifelike.
When fishing with a Texas rig, it's important to pay attention to the feel of the line and to be alert for any sudden changes in tension, as these can indicate a bite. It's also important to experiment with different retrieves, such as slow, steady retrieves or faster, jerky retrieves, to see what the fish are responding to.
It's also important to note that a Texas rig can be fished in a variety of ways. Some anglers like to rig it weightless and fish it on top of the water or under the surface, while others like to rig it with a weight to fish it on the bottom or near the bottom. The weightless rig is great for fishing in clear water or around fish that are suspended in the water column, while the weighted rig is better for fishing in murky water or around fish that are holding close to the bottom.

 

Me> Write a poem about bass fishing.

 

ChatGPT> 

Beneath the surface of the lake,
Lies a creature fierce and great,
With a tug upon the line,
You'll feel the power of its weight.

 

The bass, a fish so strong and sly,
A challenge for the angler's skill,
But when you feel its strength on high,
You'll know the thrill of the kill.

 

The early morning mist still lingers,
As you cast your line with care,
The gentle ripples on the water,
A symphony of nature's air.

 

The patience needed for the wait,
As you watch your bobber sway,
The excitement in your heart,
As the bass comes into play.

 

The fight is long and hard,
But the reward is sweet,
A trophy for the wall,
A memory to keep.

 

So come and cast your line,
And join the bass fishing crowd,
For the thrill of the catch,
Is a feeling that's never allowed to fade away.

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It's impressive, but ask it:

 

1) Which is better, a baitcaster or spinning reel?

2) Which hand should you use to reel on a spinning reel, and baitcaster?

3) How much drag does a fishing reel need?

4) How much do I need to spend on a baitcasting set up?

5) What brand is the best, Daiwa or Shimano?

6) What braking system is the best, magnetic or centrifugal?

 

Or any other question that will bring a topic to a 5 page thread in about 5 minutes.

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  • Super User

It might be best not to ask all these questions at once.  We’ve debated these for years on this forum.  Now we have the technology that can finally give us the ultimate answer. 😆  Let’s start with one.

 

16 minutes ago, Junger said:

1) Which is better, a baitcaster or spinning reel?

 

Both baitcasters and spinning reels have their own set of advantages and disadvantages, and the best choice depends on the specific fishing situation and the angler's personal preferences.

Baitcasters offer more control over the cast and the ability to handle heavier lures and lines, making them well-suited for casting long distances and for targeting larger fish species. However, they can be more challenging to learn to use and may be prone to backlash (tangles in the line).

Spinning reels, on the other hand, are generally easier to use and less prone to backlash, making them a great choice for beginners or for fishing in tight quarters. They are also well-suited for lighter lures and lines and for casting shorter distances.

In the end, it really depends on the type of fishing you'll be doing and your own skill level. A spinning reel is probably a better choice for a beginner, while a baitcaster may be more suitable for an experienced angler looking to target larger fish.

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  • BassResource.com Administrator

While there's much hoopla surrounding ChatGPT, remember it gathers all its information from articles already published on the Internet, which means plagiarism is a major issue.  It's why many schools and colleges are banning the use of chatGPT to write papers. 

 

It also infringes on the monetization ability of the copyright owner.

 

In addition, good luck if you want to use chatGPT to write about something so new, very little, if nothing at all, has been written on the subject.

 

In essence, nothing original is created from chatGPT.  It's all stolen content pieced together.

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  • Super User
4 hours ago, Choporoz said:

Probably.   But ask that know-it-all what his personal best is!

Me> What is your personal best largemouth?

 

ChatGPT> As an AI, I do not have a physical form, so I am not able to catch fish or have personal experiences. 
 

It‘s honest about the fish it’s caught!   That’s odd.   Shows they still have some work to do on it.😆

 

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  • Super User
11 hours ago, Glenn said:

While there's much hoopla surrounding ChatGPT, remember it gathers all its information from articles already published on the Internet, which means plagiarism is a major issue.  It's why many schools and colleges are banning the use of chatGPT to write papers. 

 

It also infringes on the monetization ability of the copyright owner.

 

In addition, good luck if you want to use chatGPT to write about something so new, very little, if nothing at all, has been written on the subject.

 

In essence, nothing original is created from chatGPT.  It's all stolen content pieced together.

I disagree Glenn.  Yes it gets information from the internet but it learns from it just like we do.  If you search the internet for the poem I asked it to create about bass fishing you will not find it.  It’s original and remarkably good.  ChatGPT is not perfect.  If you look at it’s description of a Texas rig it said to put the worm on the hook before you put the weight on the line.😆
 

ChatGPT is a serious problem for schools.  It can write a 1000 word essay in less than a minute.  
 

Let’s have a contest to see who can create the best sonnet about bassresource.com.   I’ll go first😁

 

 

Bassresource.com, a site of wonder,

A place for anglers to come and share

Their knowledge, tips, and tales asunder

In hopes to catch the biggest bass out there

 

With forums, articles, and videos too

There's something for every fisherman's need

A community that's kind and true

With helpful advice and fishing seed

 

From beginners to experts alike

This site has something for all to gain

A wealth of information, free to spike

Your fishing game and bring you fame
 

So come and join the Bassresource crew

And reel in the biggest catch anew.

 

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  • Super User

Do computers know more about fishing than we do?

From where I'm sitting,

that wouldn't be saying much.

:smiley:

A-Jay

(btw-I wrote that all by myself)

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  • Super User

This seems like good info overall, maybe for a novice? But I'd rather ask these questions to members here on BR. We've got lots of members who give very good info here on BR. And, it depends much on what part of the country your fishing in.                                                        A guy from Michigan will fish differently than a guy from Florida.

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13 hours ago, Tennessee Boy said:

I'm a computer geek and retired software developer.  I've seen a lot of changes since I wrote my first program in 1980.   The new frontier is artifical intelligence and the latest rage is a system called ChatGPT.  It's a system that will generate text on any subject you choose based on your input.  It's the most amazing new technology I've seen in a long time.  I sat down with ChatGPT to discuss bass fishing.  Here are the results.  Tell me what you think.

 

 

 

Not really interested in what the computer thinks. But with your background I’d love to spend some time on my boat with you to take reading my graphs to the next level.
 

 

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  • Super User
24 minutes ago, GaryH said:

Not really interested in what the computer thinks. But with your background I’d love to spend some time on my boat with you to take reading my graphs to the next level.
 

 

Great idea.  In my opinion, graph makers have done a lousy job of turning sonar data into truly comprehensible info.  And since those companies are unwilling to even make there options and capabilities understandable, I won't hold my breath waiting for better interpretations from them.

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  • Super User
6 minutes ago, Choporoz said:

Great idea.  In my opinion, graph makers have done a lousy job of turning sonar data into truly comprehensible info.  And since those companies are unwilling to even make there options and capabilities understandable, I won't hold my breath waiting for better interpretations from them.

I hate to disagree with folks who have new boats and live close to me, but that is just not the case. It's like blaming a country because you don't speak the language. 

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  • Super User
1 hour ago, Deleted account said:

I hate to disagree with folks who have new boats and live close to me, but that is just not the case. It's like blaming a country because you don't speak the language. 

Let me allay that hate.  I'll be keeping the boat in NC.  :)

 

 I don't think one should have to need Rosetta Stone to set up and then interpret output from a common consumer electronic tool.    

 

    I did go to see Doctor Sonar at the Richmond Fishing Expo the other day, but I'm still suffering from a good case of fishfinder ignorance.

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  • Super User

Gotta admit Tennessee Boy, that was my entertainment for the day.

 

Gotta throw this in there regarding technology advancement.

I let this young man Hunt my property and he has cameras up everywhere that record, take pics and store data.

He can print out a data sheet of which spot on the property has the highest percentage of harvesting the largest whitetail Buck.

 

He started hunting here 2 years ago and both years have taken the largest buck on the property with minimal effort.

 

Hmmm, under water stationary cameras.

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  • Super User
23 minutes ago, Choporoz said:

I don't think one should have to need Rosetta Stone to set up and then interpret output from a common consumer electronic tool.    

Many sonar users have a simplified understanding of what they are looking at on the screen.  They think that a pixel on the screen represents a spot in the water behind them when in reality it represents all of the returns from an area equal distance from the transducer and the shape of that area is determined by the shape of the sonar beam.  The electronics companies do very little to help users overcome this and I think they even encourage it.  If their devices are perceived to be simpler than they are then they are less intimidating.    

 

I'll give you an example where Humminbird is over simplifying something.  I have TargetLock.  The idea is you point Mega Live at a target (like a stump),  push the target lock button, and TargetLock will keep the Mega Live transducer pointed at the target.  Being a math geek I knew this did not make since.  A target has two dimension,  a direction and a distance.  Just saying the the stump is north of you is not enough.  You have to say it's 30 feet to the north.  When you watch the Humminbird videos,  they show someone finding a stump on the screen and then pushing the target lock button.  In the manual there is one sentence that says for best results the target should be two third of the total range shown on the screen.  In other words,  you pick the direction and we'll assume a distance.  You can overcome this stupidity by actually selecting the target on the screen instead of using the target lock button.  Still they should explain this so that everyone understands the limitations of using the button.  They never say selecting a spot on the screen is more accurate that just pushing the button.

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  • Super User
25 minutes ago, Tennessee Boy said:

Many sonar users have a simplified understanding of what they are looking at on the screen.  They think that a pixel on the screen represents a spot in the water behind them when in reality it represents all of the returns from an area equal distance from the transducer and the shape of that area is determined by the shape of the sonar beam.  The electronics companies do very little to help users overcome this and I think they even encourage it.  If their devices are perceived to be simpler than they are then they are less intimidating.    

 

I'll give you an example where Humminbird is over simplifying something.  I have TargetLock.  The idea is you point Mega Live at a target (like a stump),  push the target lock button, and TargetLock will keep the Mega Live transducer pointed at the target.  Being a math geek I knew this did not make since.  A target has two dimension,  a direction and a distance.  Just saying the the stump is north of you is not enough.  You have to say it's 30 feet to the north.  When you watch the Humminbird videos,  they show someone finding a stump on the screen and then pushing the target lock button.  In the manual there is one sentence that says for best results the target should be two third of the total range shown on the screen.  In other words,  you pick the direction and we'll assume a distance.  You can overcome this stupidity by actually selecting the target on the screen instead of using the target lock button.  Still they should explain this so that everyone understands the limitations of using the button.  They never say selecting a spot on the screen is more accurate that just pushing the button.

What you are describing is error introduced by the scale of the display. A target does not have 2 dimensions (it has 3, like everything else in our portion of the universe). For best accuracy (or is it precision) zoom in as far as possible (or practicable). We go though this with GPS and radar when anchoring (and stealing numbers) in the ocean. 

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  • Super User
49 minutes ago, Deleted account said:

What you are describing is error introduced by the scale of the display. A target does not have 2 dimensions (it has 3, like everything else in our portion of the universe). For best accuracy (or is it precision) zoom in as far as possible (or practicable). We go though this with GPS and radar when anchoring (and stealing numbers) in the ocean. 

I don’t think you understand what Humminbird Target Lock is. You mount the Mega Live transducer on it and it turns so you can use it to control Mega Live instead of using your trolling motor.  You can lock it on a spot and it will turn the transducer to keep it pointing at the spot as you move.  If you lock on a stump that’s 30 ft north and then you move 60 feet to the north you want the transducer to be pointing to the south at the stump.  If you only move 10 ft to the north then the transducer should still be pointing north.  The direction and distance matters.  Yes the stumps actual location is 3 dimensional but I don’t care in this case because Mega Live is live in two dimensions.  I can see it if it’s 5 ft deep or 30 ft deep.  You can select targets in different ways like waypoints or spots on the other sonar screens.  I use Mega 360 a lot to select target to lock on.  There is some error with these targets because there is no way to know the precise depth of the target on 360.

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  • Global Moderator
1 hour ago, Choporoz said:

Let me allay that hate.  I'll be keeping the boat in NC.  :)

 

 I don't think one should have to need Rosetta Stone to set up and then interpret output from a common consumer electronic tool.    

 

    I did go to see Doctor Sonar at the Richmond Fishing Expo the other day, but I'm still suffering from a good case of fishfinder ignorance.

Buddy, at this point just keep doing what you’re doing. Fish are already shut down regularly by FFS, people that dominated with it last two years say the percentage of followers that bite is waaaaaay down 

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  • Super User

A little off topic but I saw a video on the next improvement in FFS.  When you locate a fish on sonar, you mark it with the cursor and it will follow the fish wherever it moves.  As FFS sonar users know, it’s not unusual for a fish to move in and out of view and is very hard to track if moving.  

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