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Spinning Reels vs Baitcasters


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5 minutes ago, Darth-Baiter said:

i should put a 5" Senko on a scale.  i think it is fairly heavy.  i would guess 3/8th.  easily within the capabilities of casting gear.  12lb line.  

It’s never been that it’s not possible to throw a Senko with a baitcaster.  It’s always been possible and it catches fish just like me nose weighting them catches fish.  My point is that the mechanics of a baitcaster will never give the “weightless” Senko the freespool action a spinning reel will.  I’ve proven it so many times on tank demos in Bass Pro Shops seminars, it’s not even a consideration for me.  

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I started fishing with a spinning reel years before I started fishing with a baitcaster.  For me there are some presentations that I need a spinning reel for, and presentations where a baitcaster works better.

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1 hour ago, Darth-Baiter said:

i should put a 5" Senko on a scale.  i think it is fairly heavy.  i would guess 3/8th.  easily within the capabilities of casting gear.  12lb line.  

The idea is that a casting reel will cause the bait to pendulum away from cover rather than sink vertically like a spinning reel.  Which has been 100% true thing for a long time.  This is due to people smashing down on the spool tension knob and making the bait unable to strip line off the spool.  The strong braking effect of spool tension use also can impede the amount of line dispensed on the cast laying on the surface and available for the senko to consume and still remain falling vertical. 

 

At some point people began to realize we don't need to smash down on that knob and if set up properly, which is a smidge of side to side play on the spool or just eliminate it at most, and proper casting technique you can send a senko out there on casting gear and have a ton of flouro coiled up on the surface slow sinking to feed that vertical fall be it a normal cast or skip cast.  Skipping weightless plastics and getting a vertical fall is my bread and butter presentation.  ML, M and MH rods with casting gear.  I skip up to those docks and I have seen my bait sitting on the bottom exactly where it stopped on the surface or even slightly behind.   I even frequently employ back gliding rigging to sent the bait gliding way back under a dock.

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9 minutes ago, Tatulatard said:

The idea is that a casting reel will cause the bait to pendulum away from cover rather than sink vertically like a spinning reel.  Which has been 100% true thing for a long time.  This is due to people smashing down on the spool tension knob and making the bait unable to strip line off the spool.  The strong braking effect of spool tension use also can impede the amount of line dispensed on the cast laying on the surface and available for the senko to consume and still remain falling vertical. 

 

At some point people began to realize we don't need to smash down on that knob and if set up properly, which is a smidge of side to side play on the spool or just eliminate it at most, and proper casting technique you can send a senko out there on casting gear and have a ton of flouro coiled up on the surface slow sinking to feed that vertical fall be it a normal cast or skip cast.  Skipping weightless plastics and getting a vertical fall is my bread and butter presentation.  ML, M and MH rods with casting gear.  I skip up to those docks and I have seen my bait sitting on the bottom exactly where it stopped on the surface or even slightly behind.   I even frequently employ back gliding rigging to sent the bait gliding way back under a dock.


Could not be said any better 

 

 

 

 

 

Mike

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  • Super User
3 hours ago, Darth-Baiter said:

i should put a 5" Senko on a scale.  i think it is fairly heavy.  i would guess 3/8th.  easily within the capabilities of casting gear.  12lb line.  

5” Senko does weigh 3/8 oz ad ease to cast with a bait caster.

I use a spinning reel for 5” to 6” Senko’s unweighted because all need to do create slack line is rise and lower the rod tip without moving the Senko, difficult to perform with a bait casting reel. Letting the Senko swim down triggers strikes.

Tom

PS, Screw In bullet weigh is called the “Florida rig” where it was developed.

 

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10 minutes ago, WRB said:

5” Senko does weigh 3/8 oz ad ease to cast with a bait caster.

I use a spinning reel for 5” to 6” Senko’s unweighted because all need to do create slack line is rise and lower the rod tip without moving the Senko, difficult to perform with a bait casting reel. Letting the Senko swim down triggers strikes.

Tom

I’m not gonna debate anyone with so many giant bass on resume:). 
 

I do love my spinning stuff.  Honestly it’s my most expensive combos. 

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On 3/7/2023 at 9:03 PM, JediAmoeba said:

Curious what everyone thinks - As technology and reels get better do you think we will see less and less spinning reels? 

 

I can't stand spinning reels. I easily use baitcasters for everything down to about 1/20 oz. My biggest upgrade this year is 2 alphas that I paired up with light and ul rods so I can dropshot and fish hair jigs without ever having to bring a spinning reel along - I was only able to get a 7'4" rod for hair jigs but wish I had one a few inches longer. I would like to spiral wrap a rod for dropshotting with one of the alphas but a custom rod for that seems silly.

 

Once someone is comfortable with using a baitcaster, I fail to see the benefit of a spinning rod anymore. Skipping - BC has more control. I am someone that sets my drag really light so my thumb can be the drag so I much prefer the drag control of a baitcaster. With a casting rod I can easily stop a cast mid-throw - a spinning rod is harder to stop. A lot of my baitcasters have drag clickers. I don't have the God forsaken wind knots and birdsnests popping up on my baitcasters. 

 

I understand for beginner a spinning is probably easier but as technology improves, who knows. I see kids and beginners having all sorts of trouble with spinning rods. What do all yinz think? You in on the fairy wands?

I started with Spinning reels and rods. Used them for many years before getting my first baitcasting set up. I use both now, depending on application and my mood. Each has its' advantages.  I don't think spinning reels/rods are going to go away.  Personally, I don't care if you want to use a piece of string and stick and a safety pin....just get out there and fish.

 

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You all ever heard of Gary Yamamoto? 

Gary only used spinning tackle during his pro bass fishing career.

Tom

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23 minutes ago, WRB said:

You all ever heard of Gary Yamamoto? 

Gary only used spinning tackle during his pro bass fishing career.

Tom

is that the beef rancher guy?

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Just now, Darth-Baiter said:

is that the beef rancher guy?

Yeah, I think he invented some silly worm, too.

 

 

                                                            Season 3 Drinking GIF by NETFLIX

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Just now, roadwarrior said:

Yeah, I think he invented some silly worm, too.

 

 

                                                            Season 3 Drinking GIF by NETFLIX

hahahhahhaha..  yea, his side hustle

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7 hours ago, TOXIC said:

Haha.  For me, I use a screw in Bullet weight in 3 situations mainly.  1. To get through vegetation (punching).  2. To counteract current or tide 3. When I want/need a fast vertical fall like on a weedline or in brush.  Keeping in mind that once you put the weight on, it no longer has any of that magical Senko action anymore.  It’s just a stick bait.  Weightless will always be on spinning gear with 6-8lb test mono.  A baitcaster cannot mimic the freespool action needed for a weightless Senko to work up to its full potential.  

Thank you.  That makes sense!   

7 hours ago, TOXIC said:

It’s never been that it’s not possible to throw a Senko with a baitcaster.  It’s always been possible and it catches fish just like me nose weighting them catches fish.  My point is that the mechanics of a baitcaster will never give the “weightless” Senko the freespool action a spinning reel will.  I’ve proven it so many times on tank demos in Bass Pro Shops seminars, it’s not even a consideration for me.  

Toxic, I am absolutely not questioning at all, but have you tried any BFS?   I am just curious with all of your experience if it would even come close.  I haven’t tried it yet, but would love your opinion if you ever have or if you ever do try it.  They are such different mechanics I don’t know if it would be possible.  

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I've been 90% spinning/10% fly since before dirt.

I've never tried baitcasters so I'm a poor judge.

So be it. I'm happily ignorant of my folly, as long as you're satisfied with that.

Enjoy your 'cup of tea'

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7 hours ago, WRB said:

5” Senko does weigh 3/8 oz ad ease to cast with a bait caster.

I use a spinning reel for 5” to 6” Senko’s unweighted because all need to do create slack line is rise and lower the rod tip without moving the Senko, difficult to perform with a bait casting reel. Letting the Senko swim down triggers strikes.

Tom

PS, Screw In bullet weigh is called the “Florida rig” where it was developed.

 

Some would call us old school and not up on newer gear.  I have yet to see a baitcaster allow a Senko to fall on slack line without manually stripping line off the spool.  We are never going to change their minds and they will never change ours.  I’m just glad everybody catches fish on them. ?

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On 3/7/2023 at 9:03 PM, JediAmoeba said:

Curious what everyone thinks - As technology and reels get better do you think we will see less and less spinning reels? 

 

I can't stand spinning reels. I easily use baitcasters for everything down to about 1/20 oz. My biggest upgrade this year is 2 alphas that I paired up with light and ul rods so I can dropshot and fish hair jigs without ever having to bring a spinning reel along - I was only able to get a 7'4" rod for hair jigs but wish I had one a few inches longer. I would like to spiral wrap a rod for dropshotting with one of the alphas but a custom rod for that seems silly.

 

Once someone is comfortable with using a baitcaster, I fail to see the benefit of a spinning rod anymore. Skipping - BC has more control. I am someone that sets my drag really light so my thumb can be the drag so I much prefer the drag control of a baitcaster. With a casting rod I can easily stop a cast mid-throw - a spinning rod is harder to stop. A lot of my baitcasters have drag clickers. I don't have the God forsaken wind knots and birdsnests popping up on my baitcasters. 

 

I understand for beginner a spinning is probably easier but as technology improves, who knows. I see kids and beginners having all sorts of trouble with spinning rods. What do all yinz think? You in on the fairy wands?

Sounds like you are having issues with basic spinning rod use.  Drag is super easy to palm on a spinning rod as is stopping a bait mid cast.  People who prefer BC gear for super light baits are really trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist by using gear that isn't designed for said purpose and is also way more costly to achieve a similar result.  Ultimately it is whatever you want to do and use though and to each their own.  

 

I don't see spinning gear going anywhere anytime soon, nor should it.

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17 hours ago, Fishin Dad said:

Toxic, I am absolutely not questioning at all, but have you tried any BFS?   I am just curious with all of your experience if it would even come close.  I haven’t tried it yet, but would love your opinion if you ever have or if you ever do try it.  They are such different mechanics I don’t know if it would be possible

There are many more on this site much smarter than me but in all of my years using spinning gear for weightless Senkos addressing the baitcaster opinion in seminars and demonstrations, I’ve just put it this way…. In order for a weightless Senko to perform at its maximum potential, it MUST fall on a slack line with as little resistance as possible.  This fact alone rules out heavier line and braid due to the resistance tension heavy lines create in and on top of the water.  The heavier the line the more it pulls on the nose of the Senko resulting in a nose up fall.  Line on a baitcaster, even in free spool mode, must spin the entire spool of line when casting.  That means you have resistance from both the spool weight and the weight of the total amount of line you have on that spool.  The heavier the line, once again, the heavier the spool.   As minimal as it may be with the new baitcasters designed to throw light baits, there is still resistance from the bearings.  That is not the case with spinning gear.  And finally for the 90% of anglers using traditional baitcasters, having to strip line off manually as the Senko sinks contributes to interfering with the Senkos action and will increase the chance of missed strikes because the majority come on the fall and are best capitalized on by watching your line on the water.  Fall behind on your feeding of the line and the Senko will pendulum back towards the rod.  The last consideration and I honestly don’t know which setup gets the most benefit of is line guide resistance.  Do the larger guides on spinning contribute to less resistance or does the straight line smaller guides of a baitcaster?  Let me reiterate once again, I have no problem with someone fishing a Senko on a baitcaster, it is done everyday and fish are caught everyday.  If you feel more comfortable with a baitcaster, by all means throw it.  It’s just that I have thrown Senkos for so many years my mind has drilled down into the smallest influences on a seemingly simple bait the same as someone who is super proficient in throwing a crankbait, jig, spinnerbait, jerkbait, etc.

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Started out on spinning reels bc saltwater was what got me started in fishing.  Then gradually moved to baitcasters.  Tons and tons of backlashes later I've stuck with it bc I prefer to use it over spinning reels. 

 

Spinning rods are way easier to skip lures under docks or to throw into a 15 mph wind gust. 

 

 

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3 hours ago, TOXIC said:

There are many more on this site much smarter than me but in all of my years using spinning gear for weightless Senkos addressing the baitcaster opinion in seminars and demonstrations, I’ve just put it this way…. In order for a weightless Senko to perform at its maximum potential, it MUST fall on a slack line with as little resistance as possible.  This fact alone rules out heavier line and braid due to the resistance tension heavy lines create in and on top of the water.  The heavier the line the more it pulls on the nose of the Senko resulting in a nose up fall.  Line on a baitcaster, even in free spool mode, must spin the entire spool of line when casting.  That means you have resistance from both the spool weight and the weight of the total amount of line you have on that spool.  The heavier the line, once again, the heavier the spool.   As minimal as it may be with the new baitcasters designed to throw light baits, there is still resistance from the bearings.  That is not the case with spinning gear.  And finally for the 90% of anglers using traditional baitcasters, having to strip line off manually as the Senko sinks contributes to interfering with the Senkos action and will increase the chance of missed strikes because the majority come on the fall and are best capitalized on by watching your line on the water.  Fall behind on your feeding of the line and the Senko will pendulum back towards the rod.  The last consideration and I honestly don’t know which setup gets the most benefit of is line guide resistance.  Do the larger guides on spinning contribute to less resistance or does the straight line smaller guides of a baitcaster?  Let me reiterate once again, I have no problem with someone fishing a Senko on a baitcaster, it is done everyday and fish are caught everyday.  If you feel more comfortable with a baitcaster, by all means throw it.  It’s just that I have thrown Senkos for so many years my mind has drilled down into the smallest influences on a seemingly simple bait the same as someone who is super proficient in throwing a crankbait, jig, spinnerbait, jerkbait, etc.

Thank You!!   This is exactly why I asked the Senko Master!!  It makes a lot of sense.  I appreciate your thorough answer.  Very well written.  Thanks

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Baitcasting 90% of the time for me. However, If i'm dropshotting or using some super light lures, then its spinning 100% for me. Horses for courses as they say... 

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Have both. Use both. Like both. 
 

All I know is that I can skip a Senko under cover with my eyes closed on a spinning rig. I cannot do that on a baitcaster. 

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I've never understood the sissy stick mentality, guys have used spinning in saltwater forever. Saltwater fish are way tougher than any bass. I've used spinning gear my entire life and don't see that changing. I've got no issue with BFS gear,in fact I'm intrigued by it. But the truth is I can't justify spending $300-$400 dollars on a BFS combo just to get similar performance to a $150 spinning combo.

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1 hour ago, DitchPanda said:

I've never understood the sissy stick mentality, guys have used spinning in saltwater forever.

 

The first modern spinning reel was the Mitchell 300.  I bought my first one in the early sixties.  Before that, spin casting reels where the only spinning reels available.  Most were made by Zebco.  Zebco had a reputation as a cheap reel due mostly to the plastic model 202.  Many  of these reels were bought for kids and were looked down upon by adult bass fishermen.   Mitchel reels became popular in bass fishing due to their ability to cast light plastic worms which became the standard bass lure of the day.

 

Both spinning and casting reels have their advantages and disadvantages.  Until recently, spinning reels were generally faster and more fishable with lighter lines.  Modern braided line has changed much of that.    I use both.  I find casting worms better with a spinning reel.  Spinnerbait fishing works better with a casting reel.  I have never tried flipping with a spinning reel, but I can't see why it wouldn't work.

 

I am somewhat confused about the price of high end fishing reels.  Fishing reels are available from $100 combos to over $500 for the reel alone.  I don't see anything a $500 reel can do that a $200 reel can't.  Back in the fifties, the best fishing reels cost $20-$30.  Using a 10 times inflation factor, a good reel today should cost about $200-$300 and it does.  Anything over that is buying "feel good" rather than fishing better.

 

300.jpg

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I continue to use both, I still favor baitcasters.  However, spinning setups are easier for me to skip, fish lighter baits (don’t want to hassle with baitcasters), I can give myself a break (I use RH BC and reel left on Spinning) just how I learned and if my friends or family needs a rod to fish with….it is easier to let them use those setups.  I just bought my first NRXs(+), I got the 852S and that feels great!  Don’t really think it’s more cumbersome. 

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