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Spinning Reels vs Baitcasters


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I have more baitcasters than I do spinning. But just a few. I really like both. And I will use one for even some "heavier" stuff that I could use a baitcaster for. And sometimes do. But his concept that spinning gear is only for lighter stuff is a joke. Just look at the deep-sea fisherman. Some use spinning gear and catch huge fish on them. A lot of catfish fishermen use spinning gear and catch huge bass on them. Why people say you can't use a spinning setup for heavier stuff is just ignorance speaking.

 

Some say baitcasters are more accurate. That is wrong. What you might be more accurate with, yes. But either one is as accurate as the other. It is just what you are more used to or comfortable with. I am much more accurate with spinning gear. But I have been fishing with one for almost 50 years. Were a baitcaster I have used for just 3 years. Yes in the past 3 years, I have used my baitcasters more. But not much more. Sorry for the venting. But I get tired of hearing that you have to use a spinning setup for lighter stuff and can't use it for heavier stuff. That is not true.

 

It would be really sad to see spinning gear go away. But I know it won't happen. If you look at the sale numbers. Spinning out sells baitcasters. At least last I checked. But the difference is shrinking.

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I have and use both depending on what I'm doing at that moment in time.  Am I supposed to be "phasing out" my spinning reels?  Guess I didn't get the memo.  I like my spinning set-ups for what I use them for and at 55, I don't really see that changing.

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I predominately use BC but, like others, have a couple SP's setup, typically for lighter presentations, Ned rigs, and even for carolina rigs.

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19 hours ago, JediAmoeba said:

 You in on the fairy wands?

Yes!!! after 20 years of just using baitcasters I bought my first spinning setup 2 years ago.. love them now

 

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I’m surprised I don’t see many people here mentioning the benefits of slack line presentations you get from a spinning reel. It’s way easier to manage a wacky rig on slack line watching for bites on spinning than casting. I’ll throw a senko into heavier cover on a MH casting setup but in clear water with lighter line, the spinning gear does a much better job for me. I’ve crushed plenty of big fish skipping a wacky rig or a fluke with a ML spinning rig with a 6lb flouro leader. And I can do that on a reel that costs less than half of what a BFS reel costs. 
 

Also, finesse jerkbaits like a trick darter or staysee cast so much easier on spinning when the wind picks up.

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just like how i can speak two languages fluently, i am pretty fluent in both spinning and casting.  my accuracy is similar on both.  like everything, there are good days and bad days.  on good days, i feel amazing with accuracy.

 

i love being proficient at both and feel sorry if you cant even toss a spinning accurately.  it's you, not the gear bro.  :D

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19 hours ago, garroyo130 said:

 

Until you can add "for under $80" after that sentence, spinning reels will have a place

A lot of 80 dollar spinning combos have major line twist issues.

19 hours ago, Big Hands said:

 

I think maybe you just need more practice with yer fairy wand ?

I have plenty of practice. Lol 

19 hours ago, garroyo130 said:

What exactly makes them fairy wands anyways? I've heard the term and I guess it made sense when we didn't have BFS. But how is a spinning rod a fairy wand but BFS isnt? 

I have heard the term for 25 years - never gave it much thought.

18 hours ago, FishTank said:

Different tools for different things. Globally (fresh and salt), there are just as many spinning reel offerings as there are baitcasters. 

I think there are more spinning offerings than baitcasters - and it baffles me.

17 hours ago, AlabamaSpothunter said:

I accidentally hooked/caught a 10.2 Channel on 8lb/spinning gear.....took about 8mins, absolutely epic fight

 

I accidentally hooked/caught a 9lb+ Channel on a big swimbait/rod/reel/line....took about 30 secs

 

To discount the romantic and noble qualities with spinning tackle gives it a great disservice. 

 

Beyond applications, it provides both the fish a greater change at throwing/breaking off, and angler with a greater sensation of fight.   

 

Lastly the newer high end spinning reels are incredible, oddly worth the money.  Way more refined than the nicest baitcaster imho.   I have a new Certate that is a marvel in fuction and form.    How could you live without one or two nice spinning combos, life is too short!  

 

 

I have a couple nice spinning combos and would reach for 20 other baitcast combos before considering one of them.  

 

Also, a 30 second fight is much better for the fish...

10 hours ago, Tatulatard said:

The really skinny braids will floss between the spool and frame of a BC reel and ice formation is still an issue in super cold weather.  I don't think egg beaters are going anywhere.

I have never had this issue if you put your line on correctly. On a good number of my baitcasters I run 20 lb braid.

8 hours ago, gimruis said:

Both spinning and bait casters are tools that help me catch, or attempt to catch fish.  So I use both.  BC for power/heavier lures, and spinning for finesse/lighter lures.  Tossing a frog into the slop with a spinning setup doesn't make much sense, and tossing a ned rig on a BC isn't real practical either.

 

If you are limiting yourself to only one of them, you are limiting yourself on the water with tools to catch fish.  If you want to be a one-trick pony, that's fine, have at it.  I prefer to have multiple options available for the given set of circumstances.

I dont see it as limiting myself - there isnt a technique I cant fish well.

8 hours ago, Tatulatard said:

I won't defend the spinning rod frogging but for skipping an 1/10 oz ned head and plastic under a dock on 10 lb sniper I'll stand by my alphas sv 105 as the proper tool.  Egg beaters and 10 lb sniper are no fun.  I'm not a line twist enthusiast.  I will not tie a swivel to a tree and walk across the yard to the neighbor's bewilderment.  I will not troll an imaginary lure behind the boat with the bail open.  I will use a shallow spool sv reel on a ml bfs rod purpose built as a shallow cover finesse rod and be happy.

Totally agree.

8 hours ago, Bankc said:

I HATE using spinning reels.  I have no accuracy with them.  I can stop them okay, you just put your finger on the lip of the spool.  But it's the holding and releasing the line with your finger that gets me.  

 

That being said, when casting something less than around 1/4 oz., it's hard to beat the distance you get with a spinning reel.  And they handle light braided line (less than 30#'s) so much better.  No digging in on the spool.    

I see light ned baits and stuff cast really far on baitcasting gear...

4 hours ago, Bird said:

Another consideration with threads like these is what are we willing to spend on a baitcaster to accommodate skipping and casting light tackle.

My findings are the price point jumps drastically.........Diawa Steez, Shimano Aldebaran come to mind.

A tatula sv can be had pretty cheap and they don't really skip any worse than a steez.

40 minutes ago, Jerryj33 said:

I’m surprised I don’t see many people here mentioning the benefits of slack line presentations you get from a spinning reel. It’s way easier to manage a wacky rig on slack line watching for bites on spinning than casting. I’ll throw a senko into heavier cover on a MH casting setup but in clear water with lighter line, the spinning gear does a much better job for me. I’ve crushed plenty of big fish skipping a wacky rig or a fluke with a ML spinning rig with a 6lb flouro leader. And I can do that on a reel that costs less than half of what a BFS reel costs. 
 

Also, finesse jerkbaits like a trick darter or staysee cast so much easier on spinning when the wind picks up.

You can freespool easier with a baitcaster and immediately engage it while setting the hook. 

 

I cast lucky craft pointer 65's a long ways on baitcasters. And they are hella easier to work the bait with and not worry about line twist.

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BFS reels have been around in Japan for a long time and spinning reels didn't phase out there so I don't see them phasing out here.  I've been using spincast, spinning, and BC since I was a little kid so I'm proficient in both spinning and bc for bass.  My 2 beater/truck rods are spinning and they've caught probably the most fish and my PB for bass.  I'm not afraid to take them anywhere while my casting gear is much nicer so I tend to baby them.  One week I caught my PB bass on one of my beater rods with a 1/4 ounce Walmart crankbait, then the next week I was catching channels with cut bait. So like some of the comments say, I feel its personal preference.  

 

To slow a cast down with a spinning reel you just make a C shape with your hand around the spool as the line is feeding off to feather it.  Then to stop the cast you just grab the spool.  

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Spinning gear is a mainstay for me. If you count walleye and panfish rods I have more spinning than casting. I usually just use my bass spinning setup for relatively few techniques: weightless soft plastics, shakey heads, ned rigs, dropshot and light topwaters. However this type of fishing makes up about 40-50% of my time spent on the water for bass. A good spinning rod and reel is pretty much necessary for a serious fisherman.

 

Also it is my opinion that no one should ever use straight fluoro on spinning reels. I would ditch them too if I did that

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46 minutes ago, MN_Bassin24 said:

I usually just use my bass spinning setup for relatively few techniques: weightless soft plastics, shakey heads, ned rigs, dropshot and light topwaters. However this type of fishing makes up about 40-50% of my time spent on the water for bass.

This is me too.  I actually prefer to use a BC because I prefer to use a more aggressive moving lure-type approach when I bass fish, but when I need to slow down and take a slower, more finesse approach, the spinning gear comes out.  I will admit that my accuracy is not as good as it is with a baitcaster though.

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1 minute ago, gimruis said:

I will admit that my accuracy is not as good as it is with a baitcaster though.

Need - More - Practice :P

 

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40 minutes ago, gimruis said:

I will admit that my accuracy is not as good as it is with a baitcaster though.

I don't know if I've ever heard of someone who regularly uses both types who is better at casting with spinning reels than baitcasters. Of course if you have a preference for spinning stuff I could see this being different. Once you become proficient with a bc, its accuracy outdoes spinning gear all the time

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2 minutes ago, MN_Bassin24 said:

Once you become proficient with a bc, its accuracy outdoes spinning gear all the time

That's because you have more control over the line and usually casting a heavier bait/lure.

 

I can probably hit 9 out 10 dinner-plate size targets with a BC.  With spinning, its probably 5 or 6 out of 10.

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23 hours ago, ironbjorn said:

I've already ditched spinning gear all together. I had been preparing to do so for a few seasons before finally getting it done.

Me to. To bulky and clumsy.

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I think you'd hard pressed to find a single professional bass angler on any tour that ONLY uses baitcasters or spinning gear.  They all use both.  That alone should should tell you that both tools are required if you want to achieve maximum success.  Granted, we aren't pros.  But if they need to rely on both in order to be successful, that is living, breathing proof of maximum efficiency for the job at hand.

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7 foot medium heavy spinning with 10lb mono.  Pro Qualifier wide spool reel.  Senko with a screw in nose weight.  Second fish baitcaster 12lb mono 7.5 inch Yamamoto Kut Tail with a screw in nose weight.  I use both.  

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No, it’s not going away anytime soon!
 

I have not yet tried dedicated bfs, but I do prefer bait casting gear.   I feel I am more accurate with it and it is more comfortable to hold and fight fish with.   As a walleye and panfish convert, I have a lot of time with spinning gear.  I do see some advantages with spinning.   I think the drags are much better while using light line so not breaking off fish.  I also feel I can throw light baits much farther with spinning gear.   So far, there are just some advantages that are hard to deny.

I have also seen an increase of professionals using spinning gear.   I also think, with the income potential from sponsors, if bfs was that good, we would more using it.  
 

 

11 minutes ago, TOXIC said:

7 foot medium heavy spinning with 10lb mono.  Pro Qualifier wide spool reel.  Senko with a screw in nose weight.  Second fish baitcaster 12lb mono 7.5 inch Yamamoto Kut Tail with a screw in nose weight.  I use both.  

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Senko master, can I ask why a screw in weight?   I have always wondered and I don’t know many better to ask than you.  Thanks!  

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The issues with spinning early vintage reels was the drag technology, drive train support and bail design. 

Anglers still talk about their loved Mitchell 300 reels with high friction drag washers to start the spool slipping, bail springs that failed easily and a drive shaft prone to pulling off under pressure. These problems were universal with early 50’s spinning reel.

Zebco Abu Cardinal spinning reel solved the drag washer start up issue with a rear drag without friction washers. The Cardinal also incorporated bearing support for the drive shaft and the+design prevented the spool pulling off.

Damm Quick a German design added more innovations and improved spool drag washer design with lower start up forces . The Japanese Daiwa design with long tapered spools set today’s standard. Shimano introduced the state of the spinning reel with their Stradic series, still after 30 years a bench mark reel.

So, yes spinning reels have evolved along with Casting reels.

Tom 

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12 hours ago, Fishin Dad said:

Senko master, can I ask why a screw in weight?   I have always wondered and I don’t know many better to ask than you.  Thanks!

Haha.  For me, I use a screw in Bullet weight in 3 situations mainly.  1. To get through vegetation (punching).  2. To counteract current or tide 3. When I want/need a fast vertical fall like on a weedline or in brush.  Keeping in mind that once you put the weight on, it no longer has any of that magical Senko action anymore.  It’s just a stick bait.  Weightless will always be on spinning gear with 6-8lb test mono.  A baitcaster cannot mimic the freespool action needed for a weightless Senko to work up to its full potential.  

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6 minutes ago, TOXIC said:

Haha.  For me, I use a screw in Bullet weight in 3 situations mainly.  1. To get through vegetation (punching).  2. To counteract current or tide 3. When I want/need a fast vertical fall like on a weedline or in brush.  Keeping in mind that once you put the weight on, it no longer has any of that magical Senko action anymore.  It’s just a stick bait.  Weightless will always be on spinning gear with 6-8lb test mono.  A baitcaster cannot mimic the freespool action needed for a weightless Senko to work up to its full potential.  

i should put a 5" Senko on a scale.  i think it is fairly heavy.  i would guess 3/8th.  easily within the capabilities of casting gear.  12lb line.  

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2 minutes ago, Darth-Baiter said:

i should put a 5" Senko on a scale.  i think it is fairly heavy.  i would guess 3/8th.  easily within the capabilities of casting gear.  12lb line.  

There's an old thread that I copied the info from - someone went and weighed a lot of plastics and posted it

 

5" GYCB Senko = .3641oz - just under 3/8 (.375)

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This topic comes up a lot. Each time my first thought is “again?”  Then I’m amazed at the passion behind each opinion. There’s no right or wrong here. Fishing is fun (supposed to be anyway) so enjoy it your way. In my case, that includes mastering all types of tackle including casting, spinning, fly and center pin which all catch some bass in the right circumstances. 

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