Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I'm a huge supporter of catch and release , wishing more ppl would follow , I hate seeing the bass population drop ,. I was always taught to release so someone else could in joy catching as well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm 33 yrs old and have yet to witness a bass population drop, I guess I'm lucky enough to live in a good area. 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, TnRiver46 said:

I'm 33 yrs old and have yet to witness a bass population drop, I guess I'm lucky enough to live in a good area. 

Same here. What I have witnessed is overpopulation and stunted growth. Bag limits are in place for a reason. I have no problem with someone keeping a legally caught fish for the frying pan.

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I probably release my bass about 2/3's of the time, but Fresh fish is just to tasty to not eat at least some of the time. 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's probably more like catch & release in big lakes & fisheries but take your limit of fish under 15" in ponds & small lakes where stunted fish are prevalent. Nature has a natural balance but smaller bodies of water most often need angler help to keep from getting out of wack. If an angler wants to keep a limit to eat that is their prerogative. 

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Dwight Hottle said:

It's probably more like catch & release in big lakes & fisheries but take your limit of fish under 15" in ponds & small lakes where stunted fish are prevalent. Nature has a natural balance but smaller bodies of water most often need angler help to keep from getting out of wack. If an angler wants to keep a limit to eat that is their prerogative. 

 

I agree.  I have witnessed a few small ponds that once had good fishing turn into dink waters.  I may love catch and release but if I am going to manage a small water body for decent sized fish, it is highly likely that at some point I will have to perform selective harvest on that body of water.  Not to mention that anglers have a right to eat what they catch as long as they abide by the creel limits set by their state.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as people follow the rules i have no problem with people eating bass if they wish. Many times this can be helpful to fisheries. People who love to eat 20" pike are my heroes.

  • Like 6
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even larger lakes can benefit from some culling for the grill. The one I'll be fishing is 14,000+ acres and I'll be seriously considering putting any Bass in the 2#-4# range in the ice-chest rather than back in the water. Over 4# and it'll be C&R only, but I do enjoy my lemon-rosemary Bass from the grill.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spoke with the a biologist who says every habitat is different and should be regulated to fit the need of that particular fishery; instead of any broad brush rules or limits.  Some lakes need slot limits while others need catch and release only.  I eat a few fish from time to time but prefer to turn them loose for another day, however walleye are delicious and I can't help myself.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I occasionally will eat a 2 or 3 lber here and there, or a fish I know is going to die. But I do have a thing against people eating trophy fish. That said I feel like most people who are catching fish solely to eat aren't targeting trophies so it usually works out. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most biologist agree selective harvesting is better than catch & release!

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a big fish eater, occasionally walleye and bluegill I'll consume, but I have no problem with people keeping legal fish of any species. I'm not sure where you saw the bass population drop but I'd assume you might be mistaken or there was something else that played the major role in the declining population you experienced. Like others have said keeping fish is needed in most cases in order to have a healthy population.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, sully420 said:

As long as people follow the rules i have no problem with people eating bass if they wish. Many times this can be helpful to fisheries. People who love to eat 20" pike are my heroes.

I have only eaten one Pike but it was very good white meat. Instead of trying one of the 25 different methods I heard for removing the y bone, I just ate it with a fork

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TnRiver46 said:

have only eaten one Pike but it was very good white meat. Instead of trying one of the 25 different methods I heard for removing the y bone, I just ate it with a fork

Yea i just let my buddy fillet them he's a master at it. Nothing worse than a lake with too many 20" pike they destroy tackle worse then biggins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the reason there's a limit at a lake. So people that want fish to eat can get some and so that way there isn't to many small ones and they can grow properly.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me give y'all the perfect example of the success of selective harvesting.

 

Texas Parks & Wildlife 

 

Every lake in the state of Texas is man-made with the exception of Caddo.

The native Texas Bass & Northern Bass that lived in streams/rivers was the only breeding stock.

 

In 1971 TPWD brought the first Florida strain to the Tyler Fish Hatchery, state wide stocking started the following year. Over the next several years bass from Florida, California, & Cuba were brought to Texas to improve the genetics.

 

The ShareLunker Program was established in 1986, since then 258 bass of 13 pounds plus has entered the program from 55 public reservoirs. These bass are now the breeding stock for the entire state of Texas; they spawn at the hatchery & then released back into their lake of origin.

 

Many lake are doing the same program but starting out with 10 pound plus breeding stock.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I respect your opinion, but I keep whatever is legal and eat it.

 

I'm confident that New York State laws make sense.

  • Like 4
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Minnesota has had the same keep limits in effect since I was a teen (40 years or more), and we still have an excellent Bass fishery all over the state. People keeping some eating size (2#-4#) has had no deleterious effect on the number of trophy-sized Bass caught in the state.

 

IMO: A C&R only law/response will only hurt the hunt for the next state record in whatever state implements it. And that's also from my College Education as an Aquatic Biologist.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bass dont live forever .

 I  harvest several limits a year . I  prefer 12 inch bass but they are protected   so I am forced to keep  15 inchers or 11 inchers . A limit of 11 inchers wont feed the three of us , so....

 

a645bc2d-2e36-4d6d-82a4-d7a7bc414537.jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll never keep any bass..its a sin =p

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GREAT RESPONSE FROM YOU GUYS . I INJOYED HEARING FROM EVERYONE 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can’t stand the taste of bass but I have no problem with other people eating what they catch.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tick tock tick tock

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I C&R Bass.  I have no issue with anyone legally keeping anything for the frying pan.  Some folks need to and I respect that.  I consider myself fortunate that I do not NEED to but I know I can if I HAVE to.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is nothing wrong with keeping your legal limit of bass if you have a freshwater fishing license. The real problem is greedy people who keep more than what they are allowed to keep and those that keep too many bass outside the legal slot limit( depending on the location). I would be more concerned with places that have high fishing pressure, since the big bass will learn to avoid most fishermen and many of the bass will die a slow, painful death from swallowing so many soft plastics( plenty of videos and articles online of sick,skinny bass with stomachs full of soft plastics). Improper handing from catch and release bass fishing can kill bass and that's even worse than someone keeping a bass for dinner.

7 hours ago, Catt said:

Most biologist agree selective harvesting is better than catch & release!

Well said @Catt

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    bass fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing rods

    fishing rods


    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    bass fish

    fishing poles

    Truck Caps

    fishing reels
    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×