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Thoughts on Fishing when you are old and tired...


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1 hour ago, gimruis said:

 I'm still pretty young, athletic, and have my endurance.  My biggest hurdle these days is finding time.

Over time, this deal pulls a 180.

First 3 attributes fade.

Then the fish catching becomes the least arduous aspect of fishing.

It's everything else that needs to happen before & after that can be the biggest challenge.

Being light on your feet, strong, flexible & balanced is key, off & especially on the water. 

A long, full Life is the ultimate challenge. 

:smiley:

A-Jay

 

 

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3 rupture disc, torn ligaments, permanently damaged nerves, arthritis, bursitis, calcium deposits, & bone spurs definitely changed how I cast & set hook.

 

Loss of the sense of balance requires even less tackle on the deck, can't be two stepping around rods.

 

2022 put a hurt on me physically, first was almost tearing my hamstring. Close to 3 months of not walking or walking on crutches caused me to lose 7-8 lbs. Everyone says that ain't bad, it is when that weight is muscle. At 72 with my list of physical ailments putting on muscle is difficult. 

 

I followed that with having two stents put in for clogged arties. Now I got a list of meds for both day & night consumption. I got a little brown bottle I'm told has to stay on me at all times.

 

My wife & kids told me fishing alone or wondering around on off the beaten paths is a no no.

 

Like @Mike L stated, the spirit is willing but the flesh is weak.

Edited by Catt
Fingers faster than the brain
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Unlike @gimruis, I don't find this thread "a little depressing," but uplifting. I love that we old timers are still casting. 

 

I'm 67, but after launching my canoe in the dark and paddling and casting for four or five hours, I feel like I'm 97 when exiting my canoe. Sitting for so long ages me. I'm just glad there's no one there to see what a bent-backed crone I've become for a few, creaky minutes.

 

Thanks, @Captain Phil, for starting this thread. I curtsy to all you codgers who are still out there, still hoping for a bass to hit.

 

FWIW, I wouldn't curtsy to a king simply because they were born to a king or queen, but those who've had Time's chisel whacking at them for decades, but press on, well, they're royal to me. 

 

Your majesties:

 

page hearts GIF

 

@A-Jay's comment about balance is spot on. Lack of balance unraveled my parents' lives. My lightweight canoe is fast, but tippy. It's tippiness is the price I pay for its speed. It's like fishing from a tightrope. There are times I'd like a stable boat, but having my balance challenged every time I fish is good for me. 

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On 10/9/2023 at 9:16 AM, Captain Phil said:

I think I could fish well into my 80s even if I have to hire someone to go with me.

 

I've wondered about hiring someone too in ten years. I'd love to fish wilderness lakes in northwestern Ontario a couple more times before my long dirt nap. If I had a young buck to portage the canoe and gear, I could reach Heaven again. 

 

Here's my pitch: "Hey, kid, wanna make a thousand dollars to catch hundreds of bass?"

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My general health is good except for the Skelton it’s a mess.

I fell off a 8’ ladder about 6’ up and landed onto stone entry.

Being a gymnast helped me to twist during the fall backwards landing chest down on my arms tucked under, this cushion the impact. My head hit hard wind knocked out and woke up in the ER, that was 4 months ago. No serious injury because of being in generally good physical condition.

The exception is bones, my S1 is fused to the L5 vertebrae, hips have little range of motion due to excessive bone growth from DISH disease and very lucky nothing broke from the impact of the fall.

We older folks must stretch after waking up in the morning before starting off the days activity. Getting olde isn’t for sissy’s. Sucking it up butter cup is an insult to people who suffer just to get dressed and try to tie our shoes.

I didn’t want to sell my boat and most of the tackle, life changed and those cards had to be folded.

My advice is work hard to stay heathy, your time is limited.

Tom

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Having good balance at any age is important. Having good balance when older is critical to being able to do the things we enjoy (like fishing). I have been an avid motorcycle rider for my entire adult life, and I really believe that has helped with my metal awareness, reaction time, judgement, physical endurance, and most of all my balance. It is funny how one form of recreation can have such an impact on another. 

I have to work around a number of "limitations" as I age. Back in 1980 (08/16/80 to be exact), I was in a very bad car wreck. I was driving my MG midget convertible to work. As I was cresting a hill I saw a 15 passenger Dodge van coming the other way, and drifting into my lane. I moved over...and kept moving over, until I was driving down the ditch at the side of the road, and coming to a complete stop. The van keep coming, and ran into the left front of my car. That turned my car sideways, which had the van collide with and climb up the driver side door, up over the windshield, and then stop parked on my head. The frame of my cars windshield was forced down thru my shoulder. The drivers side door was shoved into my left side. The clutch pedal was pushed thu my left food.

The total damages were:  Left foot partially amputated, and turned around backwards. Left ankle was totally separated/broken. Left knee was broken, and the kneecap was broken in half.  There was considerable nerve and muscle/tendon damage to lower left leg. Left hip was broken. Pelvis was broken. Six ribs on my left side were broken and my left lung was punctured. The windshield frame sliced through my left shoulder, and the impact broke my left shoulder and forced the shoulder joint several inches outside the skin. The tendons in the shoulder were severed, and the upper arm muscles were badly cut and damaged. (Note: I am left-handed).  My jaw was broken in two places, and a bunch of teeth were broken and knocked out. My left ear was partially cut off. The orbital bones around the eyes were broken. My nose was broken. My skull was fractured in 3 places. I had three badly damaged vertebrae. 3 ribs on my right side were broken. The muscle sheath on the left side of my back was torn off the bone. And I had a face full of broken glass. When they got me to the hospital the first two doctors to attended to me wanted to amputate what was left of my left foot. I refused to let them. They called in an orthopedic doctor (Cornell University's sports medicine doctor who also consulted with several pro football teams) He said he could put the foot/ankle back together and could reconstruct the shoulder, but he did not think I would be able to use my left hand again (due to the nerve damage) and would only have partial use of my left arm due to the bone, tendon, and muscle damage. He also told me that I may not walk again due to the damage to my back, and the damage to my ankle and foot, and if I did manage to walk it would most likely be with a canes or a walker for the rest of my life. I was told by the physical therapy people that I would be in rehab for at least 6 months to a year, and would most likely never be able to return to my work again, and would be disabled for the rest of my life. I left the hospital after 2 weeks. I had to learn to walk all over again. I had to learn how to use my left arm and hand again. I ended up with a bone marrow infection that had me on intravenous antibiotics every 6 hours for 3 months. I had a heplock installed and was doing the IVs at home. One of the things I did for rehab was to go fishing. A friend of mine would take me out in his 14 ft. boat. I got a kick out of some of the looks we got when I would tie an IV bag to an oar, and he would hold the oar straight up while the IV ran into my arm. Good times.   I returned to work in 5 months (with a walker, and only weighing 127 lbs. instead of my normal 185lbs.). It took 3 years and several more surgeries, but after all that I was pretty much "normal" again. I do have some weakness in my left shoulder and it gets tired/sore faster than I would like. I have trauma induced arthritis in my left ankle, shoulder, and back that gives me some grief, but for the most part I can deal with it. I do limp a bit by the end of the day. I think that fishing and motorcycling really aided in my recovery. Both were good exercise, and doing those things keep my mental state from becoming very depressed and bleak. I honestly thing fishing helped save my life. 

Twelve years ago I got lung cancer. I ended up having a third of my right lung removed. Not fun, and to do the surgery they make a large incision in your back. Great....nothing like having the muscles in the right side of the back hacked up to go along with the already damaged left side....oh, well, back to rehab. It took 2 years to get the full strength and range of motion to return to my back. The only long term problem I have from that is shortness of breath and loss of some stamina from missing a chunk of lung. Again, fishing helped preserve my sanity and aided in the physical recovery. Motorcycling helped a lot also. 

I will keep fishing until I am either dead or totally bed ridden. Being old(er), and having a busted up body does slow me down, and keeps me from doing some of the things I would like to do, I would love to fish like Kate does, but I am just physically unable to. I had to give up days of wade fishing a river...the body just can't do it anymore. But I still get out there and fish with fair regularity, and will continue to do so until it is impossible for me. Some days it is hard to get motivated to do things....and when the weather is cold and damp, it is very difficult to be motivated to go fishing....but then I remember when I could not even really move, and I thank my lucky stars that the possibility to go fishing even exists for me, and I suck it up and get out there. It is always worth it, and it helps keep me sane, and mobile.

For those who say it it hard to get motivated to go fishing when old/sore/tired......just think about those people who would kill just to be able to go fishing for a few minutes, but are completely unable to.  And then thank your lucky stars that you can. I know I do.

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23 minutes ago, WRB said:

Getting olde isn’t for sissy’s. Sucking it up butter cup is an insult to people who suffer just to get dressed and try to tie our shoes.

I didn’t want to sell my boat and most of the tackle, life changed and those cards had to be folded.

My advice is work hard to stay heathy, your time is limited.

I don't think anyone here has the balls to call someone like you a buttercup because of your age.  I certainly don't.  I mean you might be the most decorated bass angler on this entire forum.  Aging isn't anything that any of us can avoid.

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23 minutes ago, Kirtley Howe said:

I would love to fish like Kate does, but I am just physically unable to.

 

^This^ made my eyes leak. I wish you could fish out of a canoe too. 

 

25 minutes ago, Kirtley Howe said:

For those who say it it hard to get motivated to go fishing when old/sore/tired......just think about those people who would kill just to be able to go fishing for a few minutes, but are completely unable to.  And then thank your lucky stars that you can. I know I do.

 

OMG, you are so, so right. 

 

Look for a message from me. 

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Thanks Kate....but to quote the musical  "Don't cry for me Argentina".  I consider myself to be very lucky, and in many ways blessed.

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2 minutes ago, Kirtley Howe said:

Thanks Kate....but to quote the musical  "Don't cry for me Argentina".  I consider myself to be very lucky, and in many ways blessed.

 

I have no words and I'm a writer. 

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59 minutes ago, Kirtley Howe said:

Having good balance at any age is important. Having good balance when older is critical to being able to do the things we enjoy (like fishing). I have been an avid motorcycle rider for my entire adult life, and I really believe that has helped with my metal awareness, reaction time, judgement, physical endurance, and most of all my balance. It is funny how one form of recreation can have such an impact on another. 

I have to work around a number of "limitations" as I age. Back in 1980 (08/16/80 to be exact), I was in a very bad car wreck. I was driving my MG midget convertible to work. As I was cresting a hill I saw a 15 passenger Dodge van coming the other way, and drifting into my lane. I moved over...and kept moving over, until I was driving down the ditch at the side of the road, and coming to a complete stop. The van keep coming, and ran into the left front of my car. That turned my car sideways, which had the van collide with and climb up the driver side door, up over the windshield, and then stop parked on my head. The frame of my cars windshield was forced down thru my shoulder. The drivers side door was shoved into my left side. The clutch pedal was pushed thu my left food.

The total damages were:  Left foot partially amputated, and turned around backwards. Left ankle was totally separated/broken. Left knee was broken, and the kneecap was broken in half.  There was considerable nerve and muscle/tendon damage to lower left leg. Left hip was broken. Pelvis was broken. Six ribs on my left side were broken and my left lung was punctured. The windshield frame sliced through my left shoulder, and the impact broke my left shoulder and forced the shoulder joint several inches outside the skin. The tendons in the shoulder were severed, and the upper arm muscles were badly cut and damaged. (Note: I am left-handed).  My jaw was broken in two places, and a bunch of teeth were broken and knocked out. My left ear was partially cut off. The orbital bones around the eyes were broken. My nose was broken. My skull was fractured in 3 places. I had three badly damaged vertebrae. 3 ribs on my right side were broken. The muscle sheath on the left side of my back was torn off the bone. And I had a face full of broken glass. When they got me to the hospital the first two doctors to attended to me wanted to amputate what was left of my left foot. I refused to let them. They called in an orthopedic doctor (Cornell University's sports medicine doctor who also consulted with several pro football teams) He said he could put the foot/ankle back together and could reconstruct the shoulder, but he did not think I would be able to use my left hand again (due to the nerve damage) and would only have partial use of my left arm due to the bone, tendon, and muscle damage. He also told me that I may not walk again due to the damage to my back, and the damage to my ankle and foot, and if I did manage to walk it would most likely be with a canes or a walker for the rest of my life. I was told by the physical therapy people that I would be in rehab for at least 6 months to a year, and would most likely never be able to return to my work again, and would be disabled for the rest of my life. I left the hospital after 2 weeks. I had to learn to walk all over again. I had to learn how to use my left arm and hand again. I ended up with a bone marrow infection that had me on intravenous antibiotics every 6 hours for 3 months. I had a heplock installed and was doing the IVs at home. One of the things I did for rehab was to go fishing. A friend of mine would take me out in his 14 ft. boat. I got a kick out of some of the looks we got when I would tie an IV bag to an oar, and he would hold the oar straight up while the IV ran into my arm. Good times.   I returned to work in 5 months (with a walker, and only weighing 127 lbs. instead of my normal 185lbs.). It took 3 years and several more surgeries, but after all that I was pretty much "normal" again. I do have some weakness in my left shoulder and it gets tired/sore faster than I would like. I have trauma induced arthritis in my left ankle, shoulder, and back that gives me some grief, but for the most part I can deal with it. I do limp a bit by the end of the day. I think that fishing and motorcycling really aided in my recovery. Both were good exercise, and doing those things keep my mental state from becoming very depressed and bleak. I honestly thing fishing helped save my life. 

Twelve years ago I got lung cancer. I ended up having a third of my right lung removed. Not fun, and to do the surgery they make a large incision in your back. Great....nothing like having the muscles in the right side of the back hacked up to go along with the already damaged left side....oh, well, back to rehab. It took 2 years to get the full strength and range of motion to return to my back. The only long term problem I have from that is shortness of breath and loss of some stamina from missing a chunk of lung. Again, fishing helped preserve my sanity and aided in the physical recovery. Motorcycling helped a lot also. 

I will keep fishing until I am either dead or totally bed ridden. Being old(er), and having a busted up body does slow me down, and keeps me from doing some of the things I would like to do, I would love to fish like Kate does, but I am just physically unable to. I had to give up days of wade fishing a river...the body just can't do it anymore. But I still get out there and fish with fair regularity, and will continue to do so until it is impossible for me. Some days it is hard to get motivated to do things....and when the weather is cold and damp, it is very difficult to be motivated to go fishing....but then I remember when I could not even really move, and I thank my lucky stars that the possibility to go fishing even exists for me, and I suck it up and get out there. It is always worth it, and it helps keep me sane, and mobile.

For those who say it it hard to get motivated to go fishing when old/sore/tired......just think about those people who would kill just to be able to go fishing for a few minutes, but are completely unable to.  And then thank your lucky stars that you can. I know I do.

 

I am printing out your post to hang on my wall. The next time I feel tired, sore or need a boost in motivation, I'm going to read it again.  You, my friend, are amazing!  

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I'll be 81 in December. I fish mostly at the state park now only about 5 minutes away. I used to hit the road and get away from it all in the back of some lake where nobody goes or along the river. I quit that. At my age, a health emergency or falling could happen at any time and cell coverage isn't everywhere or I may not even be conscious to seek help.

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2 hours ago, Captain Phil said:

 

I am printing out your post to hang on my wall. The next time I feel tired, sore or need a boost in motivation, I'm going to read it again.  You, my friend, are amazing!  

Well, I don't feel amazing. I just feel lucky. I was blessed with good genes for healing and blessed/cursed with a large stubborn streak. My father used to say I was too stupid to give up (he was kidding about the stupid part, I think) and to stubborn to die.  But thank you very much for the compliment.

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5 hours ago, Kirtley Howe said:

Having good balance at any age is important. Having good balance when older is critical to being able to do the things we enjoy (like fishing). I have been an avid motorcycle rider for my entire adult life, and I really believe that has helped with my metal awareness, reaction time, judgement, physical endurance, and most of all my balance. It is funny how one form of recreation can have such an impact on another. 

I have to work around a number of "limitations" as I age. Back in 1980 (08/16/80 to be exact), I was in a very bad car wreck. I was driving my MG midget convertible to work. As I was cresting a hill I saw a 15 passenger Dodge van coming the other way, and drifting into my lane. I moved over...and kept moving over, until I was driving down the ditch at the side of the road, and coming to a complete stop. The van keep coming, and ran into the left front of my car. That turned my car sideways, which had the van collide with and climb up the driver side door, up over the windshield, and then stop parked on my head. The frame of my cars windshield was forced down thru my shoulder. The drivers side door was shoved into my left side. The clutch pedal was pushed thu my left food.

The total damages were:  Left foot partially amputated, and turned around backwards. Left ankle was totally separated/broken. Left knee was broken, and the kneecap was broken in half.  There was considerable nerve and muscle/tendon damage to lower left leg. Left hip was broken. Pelvis was broken. Six ribs on my left side were broken and my left lung was punctured. The windshield frame sliced through my left shoulder, and the impact broke my left shoulder and forced the shoulder joint several inches outside the skin. The tendons in the shoulder were severed, and the upper arm muscles were badly cut and damaged. (Note: I am left-handed).  My jaw was broken in two places, and a bunch of teeth were broken and knocked out. My left ear was partially cut off. The orbital bones around the eyes were broken. My nose was broken. My skull was fractured in 3 places. I had three badly damaged vertebrae. 3 ribs on my right side were broken. The muscle sheath on the left side of my back was torn off the bone. And I had a face full of broken glass. When they got me to the hospital the first two doctors to attended to me wanted to amputate what was left of my left foot. I refused to let them. They called in an orthopedic doctor (Cornell University's sports medicine doctor who also consulted with several pro football teams) He said he could put the foot/ankle back together and could reconstruct the shoulder, but he did not think I would be able to use my left hand again (due to the nerve damage) and would only have partial use of my left arm due to the bone, tendon, and muscle damage. He also told me that I may not walk again due to the damage to my back, and the damage to my ankle and foot, and if I did manage to walk it would most likely be with a canes or a walker for the rest of my life. I was told by the physical therapy people that I would be in rehab for at least 6 months to a year, and would most likely never be able to return to my work again, and would be disabled for the rest of my life. I left the hospital after 2 weeks. I had to learn to walk all over again. I had to learn how to use my left arm and hand again. I ended up with a bone marrow infection that had me on intravenous antibiotics every 6 hours for 3 months. I had a heplock installed and was doing the IVs at home. One of the things I did for rehab was to go fishing. A friend of mine would take me out in his 14 ft. boat. I got a kick out of some of the looks we got when I would tie an IV bag to an oar, and he would hold the oar straight up while the IV ran into my arm. Good times.   I returned to work in 5 months (with a walker, and only weighing 127 lbs. instead of my normal 185lbs.). It took 3 years and several more surgeries, but after all that I was pretty much "normal" again. I do have some weakness in my left shoulder and it gets tired/sore faster than I would like. I have trauma induced arthritis in my left ankle, shoulder, and back that gives me some grief, but for the most part I can deal with it. I do limp a bit by the end of the day. I think that fishing and motorcycling really aided in my recovery. Both were good exercise, and doing those things keep my mental state from becoming very depressed and bleak. I honestly thing fishing helped save my life. 

Twelve years ago I got lung cancer. I ended up having a third of my right lung removed. Not fun, and to do the surgery they make a large incision in your back. Great....nothing like having the muscles in the right side of the back hacked up to go along with the already damaged left side....oh, well, back to rehab. It took 2 years to get the full strength and range of motion to return to my back. The only long term problem I have from that is shortness of breath and loss of some stamina from missing a chunk of lung. Again, fishing helped preserve my sanity and aided in the physical recovery. Motorcycling helped a lot also. 

I will keep fishing until I am either dead or totally bed ridden. Being old(er), and having a busted up body does slow me down, and keeps me from doing some of the things I would like to do, I would love to fish like Kate does, but I am just physically unable to. I had to give up days of wade fishing a river...the body just can't do it anymore. But I still get out there and fish with fair regularity, and will continue to do so until it is impossible for me. Some days it is hard to get motivated to do things....and when the weather is cold and damp, it is very difficult to be motivated to go fishing....but then I remember when I could not even really move, and I thank my lucky stars that the possibility to go fishing even exists for me, and I suck it up and get out there. It is always worth it, and it helps keep me sane, and mobile.

For those who say it it hard to get motivated to go fishing when old/sore/tired......just think about those people who would kill just to be able to go fishing for a few minutes, but are completely unable to.  And then thank your lucky stars that you can. I know I do.

What an amazing will and fight to live you have Kirtley!    

   

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I have a great deal of respect for many of the members here. I'd love to go fishing with many of yall, even if it was a slow day from the bank. Just being around someone that wants to talk about a mutual passion, someone with experience, what a gift this is.

 

I have always had a good deal of admiration and respect for old folks. When I was a kid, they took the time to answer my questions and talk to me. When I was 20ish, I was friends with a gent who was about 80 years old and owned a tractor repair shop across the road from where I worked. I went over of the mornings and we talked tractors and life. He taught me many things, including that friends can come at any age. He didn't get in much of a hurry, and he always supported my projects even if they were a little far fetched.

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I suppose I'm old and tired......and I work too much.   I'm 59,  I normally work 45 to 50 hours a week.   Since I was a kid I've always loved fishing.  I bought my first boat 43 years ago when I was 16.  I entered one tournament 41 years ago.  I hadn't planned to enter.  I didn't even know about it.  I showed up at the ramp and someone asked me if I wanted to enter.  I knew the lake well, and usually had a decent catch there.  I entered,  won, with 20 pounds, compared to 2nd place 11 pounds, but I didn't enjoy it.   Instead of just having fun fishing I was very focused on a bunch of big bass.   I decided then that was my first, and last tournament.   It wasn't relaxing.   Over the next 10 years I got the opportunity to fish less and less due to "life".   I was working a public job, also running my own business and raising a family.  I sold my boat in 1992 and didn't wet a single hook until December 2021.   

 

I've fished at least once a week with the exception of Christmas week every since then.  I normally only get to go on weekends except when I take vacation time from work.  I have other things I have to do on weekends so I usually only go for 3 to 5 hours.   I would be happy fishing for 12 hours straight, but simply have obligations.   

 

 

I enjoy fishing alone, but I'd take any of you fishing with me anytime you want to.   

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I’m only 29 and feeling the same way. Its surprising how many different roles fishing has played throughout my lifetime. When I started fishing as a kid in junior high, it was something new, something that was challenging and exciting to learn, something that my dad thought me how to do and something that I spent time with him doing. Shortly after, my high school years, it became something I obsessed over, reading every bass master magazine I could get my hands on, scrapping together whatever money I could to buy the latest technique, hollow belly swim baits, flick shake worms, football jigs and square bills, whatever was popular on the pro tours. It became evident very quickly to me that my father knew nothing about fishing, and became something I could teach him later on. In college it became an escape, something I would skip class to go catch a few. Fishing became less common for me after I got married and moved into a big city, still managed to buy a kayak and take it out a few times a year. But mostly this chapter of my life became more about collecting and customizing gear. I built my own rod and customized a JDM reel for Bait Finesse applications. Since then, I have relocated to the deserts of Las Vegas NV and rarely ever get a chance to fish. I have taken a liking to fly fishing, tying my own flies, and building a few fly rods for myself and loved ones. Fishing trips to me now has become much less about catching everything I can and applying my knowledge, it has become more about connecting with nature, really feeling the spiritual connection of being in the great outdoors, and creating lifelong memories. There is no wrong approach to fishing, it can mean many different things to every person, and I’m not going to judge anyone for doing their own thing while on the water. Heck, maybe one day I’ll be the guy with a snap swivel and a big red and white bobber.


Thanks for sharing your experience and story. It’s always great to hear what other anglers are doing and how fishing is incorporated into our lives.

 


 

 

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1 hour ago, wisconsin heat said:

I’m only 29 and feeling the same way. Its surprising how many different roles fishing has played throughout my lifetime. When I started fishing as a kid in junior high, it was something new, something that was challenging and exciting to learn, something that my dad thought me how to do and something that I spent time with him doing. Shortly after, my high school years, it became something I obsessed over, reading every bass master magazine I could get my hands on, scrapping together whatever money I could to buy the latest technique, hollow belly swim baits, flick shake worms, football jigs and square bills, whatever was popular on the pro tours. It became evident very quickly to me that my father knew nothing about fishing, and became something I could teach him later on. In college it became an escape, something I would skip class to go catch a few. Fishing became less common for me after I got married and moved into a big city, still managed to buy a kayak and take it out a few times a year. But mostly this chapter of my life became more about collecting and customizing gear. I built my own rod and customized a JDM reel for Bait Finesse applications. Since then, I have relocated to the deserts of Las Vegas NV and rarely ever get a chance to fish. I have taken a liking to fly fishing, tying my own flies, and building a few fly rods for myself and loved ones. Fishing trips to me now has become much less about catching everything I can and applying my knowledge, it has become more about connecting with nature, really feeling the spiritual connection of being in the great outdoors, and creating lifelong memories. There is no wrong approach to fishing, it can mean many different things to every person, and I’m not going to judge anyone for doing their own thing while on the water. Heck, maybe one day I’ll be the guy with a snap swivel and a big red and white bobber.


Thanks for sharing your experience and story. It’s always great to hear what other anglers are doing and how fishing is incorporated into our lives.

 


 

 

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Great photos, especially the stream photo in the valley! That's magazine quality.

 

That bass you're holding looks bigger than your PB of three to four pounds.

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16 hours ago, AlabamaSpothunter said:

hat an amazing will and fight to live you have Kirtley!    

w   

When you really think about it, what are the options? Not do the work to get better, and be crippled up for the rest of your life? Give up and just die? Those are not acceptable options, at least for me. I had one rehab person tell me I was "very brave"....I told her she was dead wrong about that. I was scared Shi#tless by the idea of not being able to walk or use my arm....and fear is one hell of a motivator. As anyone who has had to go thru it knows, physical rehab sucks.....but it sure beats the alternatives.

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  • Super User

At 66, I feel like I can still fish for quite a while yet. I still have fishing goals I'd like to achieve, and I'm hoping I can make them happen. Plus, we can never learn it all, and I'm still earning things.                         This is my motivation, learning new things, and striving to become a better fisherman.                                        When I'm gone, I hope they can say yes, he was good. He was a good fisherman. I'd be happy with that.

At 66, I feel like I can still fish for quite a while yet. I still have fishing goals I'd like to achieve, and I'm hoping I can make them happen. Plus, we can never learn it all, and I'm still earning things.                         This is my motivation, learning new things, and striving to become a better fisherman.                                        When I'm gone, I hope they can say yes, he was good. He was a good fisherman. I'd be happy with that.

At 66, I feel like I can still fish for quite a while yet. I still have fishing goals I'd like to achieve, and I'm hoping I can make them happen. Plus, we can never learn it all, and I'm still earning things.                         This is my motivation, learning new things, and striving to become a better fisherman.                                        When I'm gone, I hope they can say yes, he was good. He was a good fisherman. I'd be happy with that.

And, I hope they can say " quit triple posting stuff"! Sorry all

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I got a taste of Father Time creeping up on me this past year. I don't feel like I'm slowing down, but I'm probably in the 4th quarter somewhere well ahead of the 2 minute warning (I hope). But it makes you think about longevity for what we all like to do. 

 

I recently saw a video that inspired me. Most of you aren't from the North, or fish walleyes... but we have a Legend in the fishing ranks here in Minnesota. The stud multi-species/bass fishermen I know around here (Lindner, Pennaz, Schara) look up to a man named "The Griz" which the video below is about.  It's a pretty good watch even if you don't know who he is.  Some other personalities make cameo appearances. 

 

Anyway, watching him with just enough balance and strength to launch a boat at his age is not lost on me ~ 

https://youtu.be/cEEn-oLe374

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@Kirtley Howe After reading about your accident & the extensive injuries you endured it's truly amazing that you persevered like you did. My hats off to you sir. Your story is inspiring. 

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