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Do you guys think having that an anchor dropping on bottom scarce the fish away?

 

I can't imagine it helps any. Is there a certain shape that is more subtle than others?

 

Do you think spot lock is better?

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Spot lock is definitely better - if you can afford it.

 

I use a Stakeout Pole for shallow water, and a 15# Mushroom Anchor for deeper water when I want to stay put.

 

Since I'm rarely just dropping the bait over the side, I don't think the anchor makes much of a difference - long as you ease it into the water and not just toss it in.

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Spot lock and or power poles are far better than the old drop anchor. Drop anchors however only disturb fish for a very short period. Sometimes fish seem to notice my troller sometimes not. I believe they notice my transducer being on more than my troller. I’ve also noticed it depends what hertz settings I have my graphs on as to how much they seem affected.

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I'm sure they notice, but I'd bet they're more scared by the shadow your boat casts and the sound of the waves crashing up against it and you moving around inside it.  Plus the motor and sonar.  

 

So I wouldn't worry about it.  I mean, people have been using anchors and catching fish for like, what?  A thousand years?  If it was a bad combination, we'd have figured that out by now.  

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I always lower my anchor/anchors gently. No logical reason to make a big splash. 

 

BTW I do have spot lock on one boat but it loses its location in high wind and revs up trying to hold the position. For me, the anchor is a better option. 

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I think it’s minimal.  I never use one though. I have it on board for emergencies. I run spot all the time even in super shallow water.

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1 hour ago, Dogface said:

I always lower my anchor/anchors gently. No logical reason to make a big splash. 

 

I haven't used a manual anchor in a long time but this is what I would do when I did use it.  Just let it down slowly instead of tossing it in and letting it plunk to the bottom.

 

I also keep mine aboard for emergencies.

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As long as you lower the anchor slowly, and don't fish right on top of it, you shouldn't have any problems.  I use a 15# mushroom anchor.  The 10# size wouldn't hold in gusty winds.

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Anchor should have some scope on it anyway, in order to hold in any breeze an anchor needs to bite in so fishing right over them is scarce.  I use my spot lock all the time....awesome !!  However, I do fish for perch a lot....they like the bottom stirred up at times, so I use a small anchor and tie it off short so it bounces on the bottom to stir up a little silt.  This acts as a perch caller and they come in to investigate and feed !  On certain days it works great...  

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While I have an anchor 🔱, haven't used it in many years on any boat.

Spot-lock is the technology of today.

 

If you're using fish finders, dropping a bouy in conjunction with a trolling works better than dropping an mud stirring anchor. IMO 

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23 hours ago, snowplow said:

Do you guys think having that an anchor dropping on bottom scarce the fish away?

Not unless you're fishing right next to it.

Perhaps consider a longer cast.

:smiley:

A-Jay

https://youtu.be/02fPoZHOri8?feature=shared&t=1151

 

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WLike everything there is a skill in anchoring a boat.

If you plan on staying on that spot for an hour or so anchoring  is still your best choice.

1. The type of anchor depends on the how heavy your boat is and rage bottom composition. There are a lot of choices.

2. What is called Scope is the angle of the rope to the anchor sitting on the bottom. Minus Scope is long enough rope to equal about 3 X the depth of water; 20’ depth use 60’ rope.

3. Weight depends on anchor type. Navy or River anchors  15-20 lb is good for boats to 16’ to 20’. 

4. If you use your hands to pull in the set anchor suggest 3/4 rope is easier the handle, 1/2 would be minimum dia.

5. Setting your anchor you want to go past the spot you want your boat positioned after the anchor is set. Quietly lower the anchor until it hits bottom about 3 boat lengths. If it’s windy let the wind move the boat back, if not back up slowly with your engine until the desired Scope of anchor rope is out. Tie off the anchor rope through the bow wench eye or run the rope through the bow eye and tie off to a bow cleat. This keeps the boat bow facing directly into the wind.

If you 2 anchors set the stern anchor after the bow anchor is set. Let out another boat length of bow anchor rope the lower the stern anchor. Pull in about 1 boat length of bow rope, tie off the ropes. This keeps your boat from swinging.

Fish get used to your anchored boat in about 5 minutes.

Tom

 

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7 minutes ago, WRB said:

Tie off the anchor rope through the bow wench eye or run the rope through the bow eye and tie off to a bow cleat. This keeps the boat bow facing directly into the wind.

If you 2 anchors set the stern anchor after the bow anchor is set. Let out another boat length of bow anchor rope the lower the stern anchor. Pull in about 1 boat length of bow rope, tie off the ropes. This keeps your boat from swinging.

 

This information brings back memories of trying to get the anchor to hold while walleye fishing in rough water years ago.  Quite often we'd have to let out at least 50 to 75 feet of rope to make it hold.  We always used the eye at the bow as the connection point too, because tying it to a cleat on the gunnel would make the boat sit sideways in the waves, and create too much drag, thus pulling the anchor loose.  When we did finally get the boat on the spot we wanted to fish, it would often sway back and forth with the wind too.

 

My Uncle had a much bigger 21 foot deep V fiberglass boat that was very heavy and he would deploy a main anchor with another smaller one attached to the main line about 10 feet up.  That always held his boat in position.  It was a pain in the rear to bring up and keep untangled when we wanted to move.

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Having worked at a boat landing renting boats with anchors and making up anchor ropes I have a lot of experience.

I instructed boat renters how to anchor, never toss out the anchor and be careful where the rope is laying so your foot or anything else doesn’t get tangled in the rope. Very few problems or lost anchors over the years.

Today I wouldn’t offer a rental boat with anchors because the current generation knows it all and doesn’t listen to or follow instructions. 

Night bass fishing having a solid stationary fishing platform is essential. Power polls or spot lock works, just be aware of battery amp draw. I always preferred anchoring at night with a bow anchor if it’s windy. I used a milk crate to store the anchor and rope, worked good.

If you need more weight to keep the anchor set use about 6’ to 8’ of chain to hold the anchor down.

River anchoring you need to be aware of being able to disconnect using a mooring hitch for the anchor rope and have a buoy tied on.

Tom

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When I had my river boat, I frequently used an anchor. Currents that ran 4 mph meant that my spot lock was almost worthless. In fact, the anchor was invaluable. I’d drift downstream and when I found a good spot, I’d hit the switch and my 45lb chain anchor would practically nail me to the bottom. I caught plenty of smallies after dropping the anchor, which did go down slowly with the electric winch. Being that the anchor was made with large chain links, it did make a certain amount of noise, a lot more than a solid anchor did. 
 

 

IMG_0588.jpeg

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I fish mostly smaller lakes under 100 acres and use an anchor often even though I have spot lock. Usually let the wind take me along a promising area like a weedline. Gently lower the anchor, fish the area, then drift some more. Think the fish know I am there and the trolling motor confirms that. Also turn off the depth finder unless a newer smaller lake. Still use marker floats often. Again for smaller waters

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Only problem I have with anchoring is I’ve lost several, but also found a few. They get stuck in a rock ledge and they ain’t coming back . I swam around looking for one forever but it wasn’t the smartest thing I ever did in swift rapids 

 

my buddy Craig finds them like your papaw finds 4 leaf clovers. He paints them red and hands them out to fishing buddies in need haha. Sometimes in 5 mph water only a danforth or something with a claw will hold but they also might never come loose 


this is what the drift boaters use but I can’t just chuck $140 into the rapids myself 😂 

IMG-5184.png

 

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Some anchors have a chain or rope attachment hole at the base. This hole is there for a shackle to fasten the main rope or chain to pull out snagged anchors backwards. You fasten your anchor rope to the anchor base shackle then run the rope or chain up to the top shaft eye and fasten with either a tie strap or bailing wire that is strong enough for normal anchor force but breaks away when higher forces are applied retrieving the snagged anchor allow the anchor to be retrieved backwards.

Works good.

Tom 

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