Jump to content

Wind and weather - does it affect your decisions?


The Baron

Recommended Posts

I’ve always had to pay attention to the wind speed (canoe/small bass boat fisherman) but I’m starting to also note the wind direction.  Not just so I can focus on the downwind side of the lake and think about wind currents, but I’m starting to wonder if the old fable about wind from the east, wind from the north etc. is true.  I had a good day of fishing last week, with the wind having been from the south for a couple of days.  Yesterday we went out with high hopes for Lake Ontario because winds were light and we could safely get out to some nice rock shoals.  But, winds were from the east overnight and switching to northeast and the fishing was very poor.  
 

I know that just before a rain (i.e. low pressure) can be very good, and cold fronts are bad - I’ve experienced that myself this season and started to make mental note of it.

 

So, how much stock do you put in wind direction, barometric pressure or other weather factors?  Are there conditions that you’ll play hooky to get out fishing?  Or conditions you’ll just not bother fishing?  With family commitments and other duties I’m trying to figure out if I can save my fishing energy, or at least invitations to guests, for days when the fishing “should” be good, and avoid the days where things are likely to be very slow.  Just like knowing where to find the fish, I’d like to learn a bit more about “when” to go get them.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

I’m gonna think about the weather and how it’s affecting things but mostly I’m  just gonna pay attention to what I’m seeing on the water and on my sonar when I get there. 
 

Based on experience, I know that on my local lake, if there is not at least a little breeze, I can expect it to be a tough day. And typically fishing is better when the wind is coming from the South since that is prevailing wind direction. I will focus a little more on structure if the wind is directly coming into or going away from a piece of structure. 
 

Thats about it

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

You already touched on some of the conditions I look for (and favor).  There are a couple bigger lakes I fish a few times each season and I have to pay attention to the wind direction/speed.  Not only because it makes boat control difficult, but it's borderline unsafe.  I know what my boat's limits are.

 

In summertime, I try to target days of incoming low pressure if possible.  Unfortunately that's not always possible.  Days with clouds that are able to block out the sun are very helpful for the way I like to fish.  Plus I just don't like fishing in the heat of summer when the blazing hot sun it out either because that's when peak recreational traffic is on the lake.

 

This time of year, the lows can really start to drop overnight if it's a calm, clear night.  The early morning fishing is then not as good, and I will often start later fishing later than I normally would after its warmed up.  A cloud deck will keep overnight temps warmer, and the fishing seems to be improved right away in the morning because of it.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

42 minutes ago, The Baron said:

I’m starting to wonder if the old fable about wind from the east, wind from the north etc. is true.

What are these fables? I also live near Lake Ontario and would love to know what the old timers say. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

The weather is something we can’t control and never will!

We can understand the effects of weather from several view points especially #1 Safty.

Look at weather from the basses point of view, they live in water so whatever impacts their water world directly affects them. Every adult bass has experienced severe weather changes and has learned to adjust to it. Normal weather has little affect on the basses daily routine. Cold fronts rarely change water temperatures the number 1 factor that impacts bass survival, water temperate drop of more then 10 degrees in a few hours can be fatal. The bass simply change depth and location if they can.

Wind direction for most regional lakes large and small has a prevailing direction, it’s directional, changes of more the 90 degrees that upset the basses water world. Changes in light intensity can have more of an impact as bass are sight feeders. Low light helps them giving advantage over prey, bright light exposes them giving the advantage to the prey.

Barometric changes affect bass but they simply change depth to off set pressure, but it affects insects tremendously and that affects the food chain.

wind also creates waves increasing dissolved oxygen levels, good for bass and prey activity.

Tom

  

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

I dont care about wind direction its speed that I keep an eye on . Fishing from a jon boat is frustrating with winds over 10 mph. From my deck boat , the sides are high so it gets blown around pretty bad too . I also dont go if temps are over 90 or too cold . This week the weather is going to be pleasant and I plan on going at least twice while I still can. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seems like you already have a good feel on when (or when not) to go fishing. I mean, if you make family plans for something else, then just stick to your plans. Same goes with fishing. As far as weather goes, my approach is basically a neutral approach because ALL conditions can have favorable outcomes, some more than others. If I make plans to go fishing, I simply go fishing and deal with the conditions at hand, sometimes with surprising results! I know many guys who will not step out on cloudy days; same goes with a little wind, or a little rain, they simply call it and stay home. Sometimes the weather can be foul in the early morning or late afternoon, leaving the next half of the day wide open and beautiful. My best advice is to go fishing when you can and make the very best of it, just like life itself. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Global Moderator

I try not to let the wind out of the east get in my head but it does. I still go out but historically I don’t have much luck. Same with cold fronts which here the two seem to go hand and hand. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, JackstrawIII said:

What are these fables? I also live near Lake Ontario and would love to know what the old timers say. 

 
I don’t know where the saying originated, but it’s something like “Wind from the west, fish bite the best. Wind from the east, fish bite the least. Wind from the north, do not go forth. Wind from the south blows the bait into their mouth.”

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User
5 hours ago, The Baron said:

 
I don’t know where the saying originated, but it’s something like “Wind from the west, fish bite the best. Wind from the east, fish bite the least. Wind from the north, do not go forth. Wind from the south blows the bait into their mouth.”

I have heard the west and east part of that rhyme many times. Never the north and south part though. That’s a new one here.

 

I can positively say that I’ve had some very good outings this season with an east wind, including my best smallmouth trip of the entire year. Usually if there is an east wind here, a weather change is coming which often triggers a more aggressive bite.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For me, (wind=yes) + (fronts cold/warm/post) => (decision to fish=YES)

ie.. this morning bad weather windy cold in the 50s, big bass still partying around 9am-ish and I went to join the party (even tho I'm supposed to be werkin' shhh)

 

 

 

IMG_20230925_093029142_HDR.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, The Baron said:

 
I don’t know where the saying originated, but it’s something like “Wind from the west, fish bite the best. Wind from the east, fish bite the least. Wind from the north, do not go forth. Wind from the south blows the bait into their mouth.”

 

I've heard the same sayings but they don't really mean much here in south Florida. Wind is wind and where it blows from has no effect that I can tell. For surf fishing on the east coast, there's a saying "west wind, go home" but I've found the opposite to be true with that saying. Only saying lol 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

The wind direction can mean something, but it doesn't have to.  It largely depends on where you live.  

 

Here in Oklahoma and Texas, I've always heard "South and west they bite the best, north and east they bite the least".  And it's often true.  And the reason is because of where we sit, geographically.  Our weather patterns are usually caused by the merger of cold, dry, low pressure, arctic winds from Canada being funneled down by the Rocky Mountains and warm, wet, high pressure, tropical winds from the Carribean being funneled up by the Gulf of Mexico.  So usually, if the winds are coming out of the north, east, or northeast, it's because a cold front just passed through.  And if the winds are coming out of the south, west, or southwest, then a warm front just passed through.  

 

But not always.  And the type of front doesn't always play a part in the bite.  So it's more of a general idea, not a hard and fast rule.  I typically use wind direction to adjust my expectations and plan locations, but I don't rely on it to decide if I'm going fishing or not.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

Nope. I'm going if the tornado sirens aren't screaming as I hook up the boat in a down pour. It does play a role on shorts/jeans or sandals/boots. I truly enjoy fishing in inclement and windy++ weather.

I'am highly allergic to lightning, so I'll wait it out in the truck at times.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always given those factors a lot of consideration and not only for presentations and potential locations, but for what mood I think the fish will be.  Actually, that is my first consideration and I base potential locations and presentations on it.  I've had to adjust my initial 'guess' at times, but it's, more often than not, from neutral to active. I should mention I look at recent history of those factors, too.

Wind from the east just means I gotta work for a handful of fish.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/24/2023 at 1:36 PM, Zcoker said:

If I make plans to go fishing, I simply go fishing and deal with the conditions at hand,

I’m about the same way, except for lightning . It does change where I fish, Lake George can get nasty quick, I’ll go more north and fish the St Johns.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, GRiver said:

I’m about the same way, except for lightning . It does change where I fish, Lake George can get nasty quick, I’ll go more north and fish the St Johns.  

 

Lightening, yes, I totally agree, no playing around with that! Here in south Florida it can get crazy with lightening storms. I fish mainly at night and rarely if ever run into lightening. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

If i was blessed to be able to fish whenever I wanted I would pay more attention.  For me it is about speed not direction as I fish from a kayak and wind management/boat control is one of if not the top priorities of mine.  If it is sustained 15+ I will usually switch over to conventional gear rather than the fly rod and choose places that I may be able to shelter from the wind some or use it to my advantage.  Before I motorized my kayak I would consider direction and on the larger lakes make the decision to either go with the wind to start or coming back to the ramp but with a motor, doesn't matter much anymore.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

Wind and weather - does it affect your decisions?

 

Wind & weather changes are usually associated with frontal conditions. 

 

Frontal conditions during February affect bass more than frontal conditions in July.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I prefer any wind to no wind. If it's too windy for a kayak, there are some great places to fish from shore nearby.

 

Wind direction will determine where I choose to fish, especially if it's predicted to blow across productive banks or structure. I haven't found that wind direction makes any difference per se.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.



  • Outboard Engine

    fishing forum


    Outboard Engine

    Outboard Engine

    fishing tackle

    fishing

    fishing

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.