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A Break From Fishing


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Anyone ever because life got busy, kids came around, careers picked up, school, etc. Needed to take a leave of absence from fishing? This could be a couple months to a few years where a few short trips a month is all thats manageable. I'm curious because I am about to start an intense Masters Program in Fall and I'm trying to fish like a madman before 60 hours work weeks start up in Fall. Curious about your experiences and what was that time like for you?

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I fished a lot before my kiddos were born...and slowed down a little after they were on the ground. 

 

What really slowed me down were, 1.) kids sports -- lots of weekends and weeknights going to practices, games, etc., and 2.) divorcing the former Mrs. Daubs -- she willingly gave me primary custody of our two daughters, ages 12 and 10. Life got really busy!

 

I didn't miss fishing...there were too many other things to keep me busy and occupy my time. 

 

Now that the daughters are college graduates, and wife #2's kids are out of the house...I got more time. 

 

Good luck on the graduate program! 

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I am of the belief that you shouldn't have to sacrifice the things you enjoy doing in life.  My Grandpa told me once before he died that qualify of life is measured by the amount of time you have to do what you enjoy doing.

 

I've got a full time job, a family, a dog, a house, and other activities I enjoy doing but I still try to find time to go fishing once or twice a week.

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Every Basshead's situation is different.

In my world, my fishing time is super special and needs to be earned.

And even then, I never really actually spend as much time on the water now as I want to.

You can bet that I'm pretty pumped about ANY time I can go

and really try hard to make the most of each and every one.

"The most" can mean different things at different times.

Could be to Relax, to change my focus a bit, to reset my mojo, and sometimes to even catch a few.

But in the end, Fishing's a Hobby and Waaaaaaaaay down the list of priorities in my own life.

Doesn't mean I don't love it and want to go all the time.

But the reality is, over the course of the past several decades,

I've been blessed to have many thousands of hours on both Fresh and saltwater deals.

And no matter how long it may be between outings,

"Fishing" is Always there waiting for me.

:smiley:

A-Jay

 

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For me fishing is how I process my life and stay sane and it's a little 'win' I can have every day that keeps my spirits high.

 

I like doing other things too but I'm always planning my next move in the ongoing chess match with the big girls.

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I get times where I get busy and can’t fish like I want to but it is usually a temporary thing. I don’t like night fishing for bass but will do so if I get hung up working on things during the day. I’ve have family and work issues get in the way of my fishing plans but those things happen. Use to bug the crap out of me when I was younger but these day if I get screwed up for tomorrow I’ll go the next day. Weekend throws me a curve I’ll go the beginning of the week. Put your family first. The fish are not going anywhere. 

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Well, cold seasons and work/life obligations conspire to keep me off the water over half of the year -- I only get to fish with any regularity May through August, with any trips outside those months occasional at best.  I regularly go 5-6 months without making a cast.   So, in a way, I take a "leave of absence" every year.   If you can manage a few short trips a month, that's not so bad.

 

 

 

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Only thing to slow me down, old age.

 

The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak!

 

Gone are the marathon days of fishing daylight to dark. 

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I've had to take some short breaks away from fishing, mostly trying to get jobs wrapped up. But, I'm.always back at it, as soon as I can.

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1 hour ago, RenzokukenFisher said:

Anyone ever because life got busy, kids came around, careers picked up, school, etc. Needed to take a leave of absence from fishing? This could be a couple months to a few years where a few short trips a month is all thats manageable. I'm curious because I am about to start an intense Masters Program in Fall and I'm trying to fish like a madman before 60 hours work weeks start up in Fall. Curious about your experiences and what was that time like for you?


I think most of us with families reach this situation involving our fishing over the finite amount of free time we are afforded. My solution was to join a club or fish a local tournament circuit, that way I was committed to fish at least one day a month come hell or high water. There will always be time to fish @RenzokukenFisher, it’s when you have the opportunity to go you seem to appreciate it a little more.

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Throughout my career I've been able to work 4 tens or 3 twelves & an 8.

 

A 3 day weekend is huge for the working class stiff.

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Absolutely. I’ve had to take several breaks over the past several months. It happens. You just roll your sleeves up and tell yourself that the fish will be waiting for you when you get back. 
 

Best of luck to you in the Master’s program and congratulations on continuing your education!

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If you work all the time, you are going to burn out.  Same with fishing.  You have to mix it up, and make some time for yourself.

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This hits home for me. I have always been involved in hunting and fishing. It is part of my DNA. A couple of years ago I took a different job at the same university where I teach. This new job deals with programs that have 12 month enrollment. This also involves some teaching on Saturdays. I took the position for a $30k per year raise. It wound up consuming all of my time, and I only got to fish a couple of times over two years. I finally realized I was going to waste the time of my life where I can really enjoy fishing, so I told them something had to give. I suppose they listened, and now I am back to fishing regularly. The point of this whole story is that you can’t give up what you love. Make the time for it. I was miserable. By all means, set aside time for your studies and work hard on that, but don’t miss out on your life. 

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I only do a few short trips a month the way it is now. Doing it all the time also felt like a job to me. I fish 3-5 hours then go home happy and relaxed.
 

On the flip side if I want to call off work a few times a year to go fish I will. I know I’m going to work more days in my life than I ever will fish. I am young know I’ll never retire so why not enjoy today when tomorrow isn’t promised. I do not recommend putting yourself in any immoral, poor financial, or marital situation to do this. 

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Having children, working 6 days a week, wife going back to school all slammed the door on fishing...... sold the boat.

 

Retired, kids moved out, bought a boat and fish 3 days per week.

 

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Not sure why anyone has to put a label on it. Priorities change as life goes on. Some periods you have more time than others. If you are like me and Fishing is something you do to help regulate yourself you can find a window of time every so often to get out there and fish a bit. It may not be an all day event, half day, may be on foot, may only be 2-3 hours but it can really refresh you. Burnout is real and for me, a job is only meant to support your family and what you enjoy doing. Your job will replace you in weeks, you and your family will never get back the time you dedicated to a job in your prime years. The second I can retire I'm gone. 

 

Coming from a guy with a 3yo girl who is glued to my side, a 3 month old boy we just had, house to take care of, closest family 3 hours away so frequent trips and 2 other hobbies than take up as much time as fishing. My year has certainly been slower fishing wise but every so often I get some time in. I'm sure it will pick up when my 3yo can starting coming out with me, she already has her own rod she loves to practice casting with and plays with my jigs when I'm pre-rigging. 

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15 hours ago, Catt said:

Only thing to slow me down, old age.

 

The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak!

 

Gone are the marathon days of fishing daylight to dark. 

 

This is largely my story, but when I was younger, other things pulled me off the water, like a career where I lectured to more than a million people. Standing before 500 to 1,000 people everyday draws a lot of current and my power plant only produced/produces so much current, so during that stretch, I didn't fish. 

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17 hours ago, RenzokukenFisher said:

 Needed to take a leave of absence from fishing? 

 

I call that winter.

 

More seriously though, I'm a strong introvert on the MBTI scale which means I derrive my energy from alone time, quiet contemplation, etc.  If I didn't fish and hunt I wouldn't be able to do the other things in my life like being social with friends or being engaged at work.  

 

How much I get to go varies.  From 2020 to this early spring I had a combination of jobs that mostly meant I set my own schedule.  I had bosses that so long as the job got done I was free to do things as I saw fit.  It meant I would cluster my calendar with morning meetings and meetings on certain days while leaving other days free or free in the afternoon.  I was fishing 3 days a week most weeks and that didn't include going on the weekends.  Similar when hunting season came around.  I've taken meetings in a treestand and listened to town halls in the kayak.

 

Caught with headphones in.

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However, a new role in Feb plus a consistent gym routine 3 days a week means that this year has been limited. I've had to fish the weekends a little more which means an early morning to be home for whatever saturday afternoon plans we have.  

 

Prior to that, we lived in the UK for 12 years.  There is basically no bass fishing in the UK.  So I had to bide my time with trout, carp, and some other things.  I hunted a little more since I could do it year round.  

 

You'll have to find what works for you.

 

35 minutes ago, ol'crickety said:

 

This is largely my story, but when I was younger, other things pulled me off the water, like a career where I lectured to more than a million people. Standing before 500 to 1,000 people everyday draws a lot of current and my power plant only produced/produces so much current, so during that stretch, I didn't fish. 

 

I'm just the opposite.  Interracting with that many people daily would definitely draw a lot of current from me.  But fishing would recharge it.  

 

Also curious what you were lecturing/where. 

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32 minutes ago, casts_by_fly said:

 

 

 

 

Also curious what you were lecturing/where. 

Curious as well.

Governor of Maine maybe 🤔 

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I have had multiple influences on my “fishing life”. In the beginning (we’ll leave that date open) my sheer enthusiasm for the sport progressed into a side gig guiding to relieve the stress of a uber demanding job that had me on the road a lot doing super high stress activities.  My fishing got more intense as time went on to the point I had a full stable of top brand sponsors and worked in shows, seminars, appearances, events and even started traveling for them.  My “9 to 5” didn’t allow me to tournament fish because of my constant travel.  The lake I guided on had some tournament series sponsored by various marinas and I was asked politely not to enter because they felt it would drop their participation.  I obliged and actually benefitted from tournament anglers hiring me to prefish.  Keeping this schedule for over 15 years kind of burned me out on fishing.  Now that I’m retired, I have the ability to go when I want and I look forward to annual trips to Florida and Michigan.  I’ve kept some sponsors by writing articles and other obligations and I’m still on staff for a Rep company and will occasionally travel.  Long story long, I’ve got my fishing in a place where it feels comfortable for me.  

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4 minutes ago, TOXIC said:

I have had multiple influences on my “fishing life”. In the beginning (we’ll leave that date open) my sheer enthusiasm for the sport progressed into a side gig guiding to relieve the stress of a uber demanding job that had me on the road a lot doing super high stress activities.  My fishing got more intense as time went on to the point I had a full stable of top brand sponsors and worked in shows, seminars, appearances, events and even started traveling for them.  My “9 to 5” didn’t allow me to tournament fish because of my constant travel.  The lake I guided on had some tournament series sponsored by various marinas and I was asked politely not to enter because they felt it would drop their participation.  I obliged and actually benefitted from tournament anglers hiring me to prefish.  Keeping this schedule for over 15 years kind of burned me out on fishing.  Now that I’m retired, I have the ability to go when I want and I look forward to annual trips to Florida and Michigan.  I’ve kept some sponsors by writing articles and other obligations and I’m still on staff for a Rep company and will occasionally travel.  Long story long, I’ve got my fishing in a place where it feels comfortable for me.  

 

I think that's what you might call 'finding your own balance'.  I like it.  

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18 hours ago, RenzokukenFisher said:

Anyone ever because life got busy, kids came around, careers picked up, school, etc. Needed to take a leave of absence from fishing? This could be a couple months to a few years where a few short trips a month is all thats manageable. I'm curious because I am about to start an intense Masters Program in Fall and I'm trying to fish like a madman before 60 hours work weeks start up in Fall. Curious about your experiences and what was that time like for you?

The wife started Weight Watchers a couple years ago. In that time she has lost 120+ lbs. But she plateaued and wanted to join a gym, which we did last April, 14 months ago. I really joined just to be supportive of her, but I kinda got addicted. Now I work out 5-6 times a week. You can do it in any weather, any time. Add to that I have an old car that I enjoy tinkering with. Fishing took a back seat for the first time on about 15 years.

 

I also lost the place I caught all my big fish. The landowner sold and I can't get in anymore. It was about 2 miles from my house, private and full of big bass. I haven't been in this calendar year. My daughter asked me if I was depressed. I said "No, I just shifted priorities, I guess." I hope to get a day on the water soon, but my option for locations has dwindled.

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Many times.  And college was one of them. 

 

A little self sacrifice is a good thing.  In our Amazon Prime lifestyle, we often loose sight of the joys of delayed gratification.  It's hard to sell a better tomorrow when they could sell you a better today.  But invest in the things that you love and the things that love you.  The interest compounds over time. 

 

Honestly, it's not as big of a deal as it sounds.  You'll get busy and distracted and won't miss it too much after the initial shock of having your old life uprooted wears off.  You likely won't have time to be bored or thing about what you're missing out on.  Life it going to get intense for a bit, but you'll come out the other end better for it.  Do a little of what you don't want now, so you can do a whole lot of what you do want later. 

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