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My Problem With YouTube Fishing Videos...


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Being pretty young I am very very competent at video editing and digital media, programing, and even dabbled in software creation, expecially when I was younger and in high-school. The whole reason I came to the outdoors and fishing is to escape the God forsakeness of the internet in general, when you dive as deep as i did you truly wish you never knew what it offered, its a chimera. 

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I wish the YouTube creators would read this thread. Again and again, we fishers want to see the how-to and hear the why-to. Not footage about stopping for gas. Not chatter about them being sleepy in the morning. Not exaggeration about the size of the fish they just lost. And certainly not chucking bass into the water. I want to get inside a fellow fisher's head and I want closeups of their hands to see how they're working the lures. 

 

Y'all might have noticed how I use "fisher." I wish everyone would. A man isn't a hunterman. He's a hunter. A guy behind the wheel isn't a driverman. He's a driver. So, we all should be fishers instead of fishermen and fisherwomen. Why slap on an extra syllable or two?

 

34 minutes ago, Darth-Baiter said:

I’m actually not into the scantily clad fisher person fish videos either.  

 

Yeah, those are goofy.

 

48 minutes ago, Bluebasser86 said:

Not interested in watching someone trying to play the victim when "COPS CALLED FOR FISHING??", when they were clearly trespassing and breaking the law.

I like everything BlueBasser86 wrote, but I'm glad he raised ^this^ because I've watched a few of those videos and they're clickbait. 

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I used to really enjoy watching lots of fishing videos. I enjoy information big fish being caught. I do also like seeing the struggle at times(mainly musky videos). I did really enjoy Ike’s story and b lat on how they made it in the sport. Lately I have just been using videos to see how people use different skills but adapt them to their waters. Also I like to watch a lot of local water videos for the days I’m missing out being on the water.

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45 minutes ago, PressuredFishing said:

Being pretty young I am very very competent at video editing and digital media, programing, and even dabbled in software creation, expecially when I was younger and in high-school. The whole reason I came to the outdoors and fishing is to escape the God forsakeness of the internet in general, when you dive as deep as i did you truly wish you never knew what it offered, its a chimera. 

dang.  i just wanted to commend you on the fine use of "Chimera"!  fantastic.  

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When it comes to fishing video content type and presentations,

I'd like to offer some food for thought which might help some basshead's here understand why certain video's are presented the way they are

and perhaps why channels often seem to evolve a bit over time. 

YouTube Creators who have channels that have over 1K subscribers and over 4k hours of viewing are eligible for monetization. (Insert commercial advertisement) 

That can and often does change things.

Creators are also offered something called YouTube Studio.

This is basically channel analytics on steroids.

Just about every conceivable aspect regarding how each video is viewed,

who is watching and for how long is captured.

It's actually pretty intense.  

Long story short, if a Creator wants to, he/she can use this information to make more

of what people watch most, and many do. 

Can't blame them really.

While clearly not always the case, the more subscribers a channel has,

the more of a factor this may be.

 

When I am looking 'for something else' in the way of content that might be less $$ driven

and contain 'less popular' but perhaps just as useful info (and not just entertainment)

I start with non-monetized channels with less subscribers. 

 

I will add that the BassResource.com channel is IMO,

one very decent exception to the rule. 

 

Finally, I don't 'use' that Studio deal at all.

Not a factor for me and never will be.

I deliberately present my content in a manner that 'misses' most of the

analytics simply because it's not why I do what I do. 

YouTube still sends a monthly email that let's me know everything about

"how my channel performed". 

I delete it.

As long as the channel is still there in the morning,

I'm good.

:smiley:

A-Jay

 

 

 

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36 minutes ago, A-Jay said:

When it comes to fishing video content type and presentations,

I'd like to offer some food for thought which might help some basshead's here understand why certain video's are presented the way they are

and perhaps why channels often seem to evolve a bit over time. 

YouTube Creators who have channels that have over 1K subscribers and over 4k hours of viewing are eligible for monetization. (Insert commercial advertisement) 

That can and often does change things.

Creators are also offered something called YouTube Studio.

This is basically channel analytics on steroids.

Just about every conceivable aspect regarding how each video is viewed,

who is watching and for how long is captured.

It's actually pretty intense.  

Long story short, if a Creator wants to, he/she can use this information to make more

of what people watch most, and many do. 

Can't blame them really.

While clearly not always the case, the more subscribers a channel has,

the more of a factor this may be.

 

When I am looking 'for something else' in the way of content that might be less $$ driven

and contain 'less popular' but perhaps just as useful info (and not just entertainment)

I start with non-monetized channels with less subscribers. 

 

I will add that the BassResource.com channel is IMO,

one very decent exception to the rule. 

 

Finally, I don't 'use' that Studio deal at all.

Not a factor for me and never will be.

I deliberately present my content in a manner that 'misses' most of the

analytics simply because it's not why I do what I do. 

YouTube still sends a monthly email that let's me know everything about

"how my channel performed". 

I delete it.

As long as the channel is still there in the morning.

I'm good.

:smiley:

A-Jay

 

 

 

Andy, You need to do a video working out on the boat. Catching one of those monster SM would be bonus footage. Keep up the great work.?

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I like to watch old videos with Doug Hannon. Glenn has great ones to. Hooked on Headwaters is a good one also. Otherwise I just go fishing myself. That's where I want to be anyway.

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Guess I lied...I watch @Bluebasser86 videos often...oh and I've watched @Glenn video about reapers about 36 times because they intrigue me.

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16 minutes ago, DitchPanda said:

Guess I lied...I watch @Bluebasser86 videos often...oh and I've watched @Glenn video about reapers about 36 times because they intrigue me.

Better buy them now!

Tom

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21 hours ago, Bankc said:

I definitely have no desire to produce my own videos.  It's way too much work, and I fish to have fun. 

 

What's funny is I have a degree in video production (actually graphic design with an emphasis on digital media).  So maybe that's why.  I wouldn't feel right doing anything but a high-quality production, which takes a TON of time and planning and a bit of money.  And I just want to fish.  

 

That being said, what I like best about fishing videos are videos of people fishing and NOT catching fish.  That's my biggest complaint.  Way too many videos are of people talking about gear and not fishing, then cuts to them setting the hook and reeling in a fish.  That doesn't help me much.  Show me the work behind all of that.  Show me why you're casting where you are.  Show me your retrieve.  Show me how you're making the decision to change your approach.  Show me the stuff that will make me a better angler.  I don't care about the stuff that makes you LOOK like a better angler.  Not that I don't understand why videos are shot that way.  I do.  I get that that's what most people want to see, and getting views gets you paid.  We all have to eat, right?  But I'm looking for ways to get better, not people to live vicariously through.  

thats the kind of stuff i mean. like show the whole process. these are the seasonal conditions, these are the weather and water conditions. heres the type of location im fishing and why. heres my lure selection based on the above conditions. that type of thing. now i realize not everybody is gonna watch that type of video because its long, but to me if the content is quality i dont care about the time.As WRB said there is no substitute for time on the water but these kind of educational videos give me some things to think about and experiment with and a base to work off of to find what works for me under those conditions.

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I’ve watched some people I know make a nice living out of YouTube videos. Yet it seems after a while they starve for content and it certainly shows. Most fishing channels start off with a bang and then fizzle out after a while. The videos can get down right boring. No one knows that much! They grab at anything, any topic almost blindly and then try to make something of it--for themselves, mainly. Or they just do a lot of fill-in stuff with drones and so forth. As far as what I like about fishing video's: I like the ones that take content and make something very real out of it that actually works. It’s not some kind of “watch me fish” video but has real value to its content and has real end results for all viewers. Granted, the topics well will eventually dry up because, truthfully, no one knows everything. What they do at that point is ride the wave and hope for the best. Some start baiting their video intros, using whatever tactics they can to get people to click them because they get paid not so much on the amount of subscribers/viewers they have but on the amount of advert clicks they might get by each of those subscribers and viewers. It's a clicky rat race, for sure. And I don't think I'd be so happy being a part of it. My 2 pennies. 

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On 11/30/2022 at 7:05 AM, Skunkmaster-k said:

Glenn has great videos. I watch him before I go to sleep every night . It’s not as weird as it sounds. I love you Glenn !

Ya....that does sounds a little weird.  LOL!  Thanks for watching though. I hope my videos help you catch more fish!

 

 

 

 

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On 11/30/2022 at 11:00 AM, A-Jay said:

Finally, I don't 'use' that Studio deal at all.

Not a factor for me and never will be.

I deliberately present my content in a manner that 'misses' most of the

analytics simply because it's not why I do what I do. 

YouTube still sends a monthly email that let's me know everything about

"how my channel performed". 

I delete it.

As long as the channel is still there in the morning.

I'm good.

I'm basically the same.  My sponsors are more interested in social media than my Youtube channel.  Which frees me up to do whatever I want to do.  I mention specific brand names and models in my videos only because I get so many questions about what I was using if I don't.  So I'm not trying to push products in my videos.  Just trying to help others catch more fish.

 

My production quality comes from over a decade of experience in broadcast video and non-broadcast professional production. It's actually my major in college. I worked in cutting-edge digital studios and networks to hone my technical skills. I won two Telly Awards in the process.  Now I apply what I learned to my videos. 

 

The technology should help tell a story, not be part of the story.  If you watch a video, and NOT notice jump-cuts, wind noise, jittery pictures, bad audio, needless filler shots and drone shots, and instead focus on the message without even thinking about the audio or framing of a picture, or how many camera angles were shown, or notice the background music or weird video transitions, then that's a professional video. That's what I do.

 

YouTube analytics are a joke, really.  Most people don't know how to interpret the data, so they end up doing more of the same stuff over and over again, hoping it will "work".  I have the unique luxury of owning this site, which provides me with way more insights than YouTube could ever provide.  So I can learn what people really want to see.  As a result, my videos take on a different path than most U-Tubers.

 

Better still, I have a full-time job completely separate from BassResource.  I get regular paychecks from my job, so I don't rely on the "income" as much as the other tubers.  It's more of a supplemental income if you will.  That frees me up to make videos about stuff that might not be as popular or make as much $$ as other topics. 

 

That's why you don't see me peddling products, making outlandish contrived videos, or creating clickbait. I'm just another bass angler like you guys.

 

On a different note, just reading the comments on this thread demonstrates there's no "right" way to make videos.  Some people like to watch others fish and catch fish. Others want straight-up instructional videos with little "fluff".  Some like a blend. I've had people tell me they like the music in my videos, while others tell me they hate it.  Some say I blather on and on with too many details, others say I don't give them enough details. Some people say I don't show enough footage of me catching fish, while others say that same footage wastes their time.

 

One thing is for sure, no matter what you do, some folks will love it, others will like it, and even more, will hate it.  That's the hard truth of having a YouTube channel.

 

To that, I say I just do what I want to see on videos. And if others enjoy it, great.  If not, they have plenty of other channels to choose from.

 

I just hope in some small way I can pay it forward and help others enjoy fishing as much as I do.

 

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On 11/30/2022 at 9:30 AM, scaleface said:

Short and no B.S . 

This is a pretty accurate description of Mrs. T-Billy!!! ? 

 

I like instructional videos that are detailed and straight to the point. Glenn and Tactical Bassin do a great job of this. I also enjoy videos with hosts that I find entertaining. Love Zona, and I find Richard Gene entertaining, while providing solid instruction. He's a goof, but RG the fishin machine can catch 'em.

I like watching @A-Jay catch those big brown bass too. I'm not the jealous type, but brother seeing you haul those giant brownies turns me a little green. ? I never got around to fishing a chatterbait in those frigid waters last spring, but I'm gonna make a point of it next spring. I've stumbled across some chunk rock structure tailor made for it while chasing those muskie this fall.

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9 hours ago, Glenn said:

The technology should help tell a story, not be part of the story.  If you watch a video, and NOT notice jump-cuts, wind noise, jittery pictures, bad audio, needless filler shots and drone shots, and instead focus on the message without even thinking about the audio or framing of a picture, or how many camera angles were shown, or notice the background music or weird video transitions, then that's a professional video. That's what I do.

 

When I teach writing, I tell my students to not insert themselves into the story, but to simply be the wire that carries the story. Glenn just described the video version of this advice. 

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I thought I wanted to make YT videos. Then I tried it and it was a pain and got in the way of my fishing. I'm grateful that others do it and it has taught me a lot. But I just don't enjoy fiddling with electronics whilst trying to catch fish.

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7 hours ago, the reel ess said:

I thought I wanted to make YT videos. Then I tried it and it was a pain and got in the way of my fishing. I'm grateful that others do it and it has taught me a lot. But I just don't enjoy fiddling with electronics whilst trying to catch fish.

Bout dropped my phone in the river filming a 1:00 clip today hahaha

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As a kayak angler I like NDYakAngler the best.
Low key, just fishing,and no hard pushing products, he just tells you what he's using, no reminders to subscribe.
Plus he's fishing some really beautiful areas up in North Dakota and Minnesota. Makes me envious being here in New Jersey.
One of the comments was he is the Bob Ross of fishing ?
I put them on while working out.

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21 hours ago, Glenn said:

I'm basically the same.  My sponsors are more interested in social media than my Youtube channel.  Which frees me up to do whatever I want to do.  I mention specific brand names and models in my videos only because I get so many questions about what I was using if I don't.  So I'm not trying to push products in my videos.  Just trying to help others catch more fish.

 

My production quality comes from over a decade of experience in broadcast video and non-broadcast professional production. It's actually my major in college. I worked in cutting-edge digital studios and networks to hone my technical skills. I won two Telly Awards in the process.  Now I apply what I learned to my videos. 

 

The technology should help tell a story, not be part of the story.  If you watch a video, and NOT notice jump-cuts, wind noise, jittery pictures, bad audio, needless filler shots and drone shots, and instead focus on the message without even thinking about the audio or framing of a picture, or how many camera angles were shown, or notice the background music or weird video transitions, then that's a professional video. That's what I do.

 

YouTube analytics are a joke, really.  Most people don't know how to interpret the data, so they end up doing more of the same stuff over and over again, hoping it will "work".  I have the unique luxury of owning this site, which provides me with way more insights than YouTube could ever provide.  So I can learn what people really want to see.  As a result, my videos take on a different path than most U-Tubers.

 

Better still, I have a full-time job completely separate from BassResource.  I get regular paychecks from my job, so I don't rely on the "income" as much as the other tubers.  It's more of a supplemental income if you will.  That frees me up to make videos about stuff that might not be as popular or make as much $$ as other topics. 

 

That's why you don't see me peddling products, making outlandish contrived videos, or creating clickbait. I'm just another bass angler like you guys.

 

On a different note, just reading the comments on this thread demonstrates there's no "right" way to make videos.  Some people like to watch others fish and catch fish. Others want straight-up instructional videos with little "fluff".  Some like a blend. I've had people tell me they like the music in my videos, while others tell me they hate it.  Some say I blather on and on with too many details, others say I don't give them enough details. Some people say I don't show enough footage of me catching fish, while others say that same footage wastes their time.

 

One thing is for sure, no matter what you do, some folks will love it, others will like it, and even more, will hate it.  That's the hard truth of having a YouTube channel.

 

To that, I say I just do what I want to see on videos. And if others enjoy it, great.  If not, they have plenty of other channels to choose from.

 

I just hope in some small way I can pay it forward and help others enjoy fishing as much as I do.

 

Glenn your video’s have helped hundreds if not thousands of bass angler’s including me?

Tom

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12 minutes ago, WRB said:

Glenn your video’s have helped hundreds if not thousands of bass angler’s including me?

Tom

 

Season 1 Netflix GIF by Stranger Things

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I watch videos on water I’m planning to fish no matter who makes them. I only have a few that I’m subbed to, and that’s more to help them out than anything.

I have been thinking about making some fishing videos, but I’m terrible with technology. 

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When it comes to television shows I’ll watch pretty much all of them but 3 I really enjoy for different reasons are “waters & woods” straight up catching with some great personalities (Pete Maina) is my favorite guest, Mark Zona love his humor and passion for fishing and finally the one show I find myself not wanting to miss “Lindner’s Angling Edge” heck for that matter anything done by the Lindner’s. Although I don’t fish from a boat, have/use electronics, or fish for Al’s favorite specie (walleye) I find their shows to be a good combination of everything I want in a show. It helps I enjoy many of the brands they promote and they mostly fish the Midwest particularly Minnesota but I do love the content and I personally enjoy the ending segment as well, anyone who’s watched the show knows what I’m referring to. As far as You Tube my personal favorite is DEBO’S fishing, I’ve been watching him since he was reviewing/using Kast King products to now using quite a few top end reel’s from many different companies. His channel is quite varied and although I’ve not tried it I enjoy his lure painting videos as well.

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It's not primarily a fishing channel, but there is brook trout fishing on a channel I love. It's more of a paddling channel and the creator is Justin Barbour on YouTube. He goes DEEP into the wilderness. What I love about him is how he loves all of it, the trials and the easy joys. He's often uncomfortable, but he's always happy and grateful. And he catches brook trout in many places, one after another.

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