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Do you agree with this quote?


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32 minutes ago, LrgmouthShad said:

From commentary on a Journal Science study done sixty years ago on the effects of dopamine:

 

“But instead of pleasure, intoxication, or happiness, they [the study participants] tended to repeatedly stimulate an area of the Midline Thalamus [being able to choose to stimulate different parts of their brain]. It causes mild frustration and anticipation. Huberman calls it the hope center of the brain.”

 

The hunt is very enjoyable

 

 

Source:

https://medium.com/mind-cafe/a-neuroscientists-simple-recommendation-for-a-more-enjoyable-life-77cf343a0c3

Yeah, that's the random reward thing that makes gambling so alluring as well, we are hardwired for it. If we caught fish easily every time, we'd get bored with it. There was a pier in Norfolk, where you could go at night and catch striped bass every cast for hours, it quickly lost it's appeal except for a quick fix.

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When I was a kid we were camping (in a tent) on Lake James.  We had a campfire near the water and were fishing for catfish.   We kept catching little bullheads.   After several my Grandfather threw an empty hook back out so he could relax.   

 

(I've heard of people doing this while they were drinking.  My Grandfather didn't drink, he just wanted to relax)

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I doubt I’d be driving to the lake at 3:30am if I knew I wasn’t going to catch anything, but I’ve never wished I didn’t go or had a bad time on the water. 

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10 hours ago, Team9nine said:

Nope - 

 

"You go fishing to catch fish. Forget the defensive rationalization about the fresh air, sunshine, and pretty scenery. People talk about these things only to disguise the fact they're not catching fish. Concentrate on the fish. Then you'll enjoy the fringe benefits even more."

 

Bill Binkelman

December, 1963

 

YMMV :cool7:

 


I could not have said it better. I bought jigs from Bill way back when. 

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10 hours ago, ol'crickety said:

If you don't enjoy fishing when you don't catch a fish, you shouldn't be a .             

 

I like everything about fishing, the gear, tackle, being out in the environment……good or bad. How many times have we heading out to go fishing in bad weather?

I enjoy casting too, the smoothness of the reel as the lure sails towards the target. Watching it hits it’s mark, hoping  for that reaction strike that happens when the lure makes contact with the water. 
Like the tackle too, how many of us are going organize and probably reorganize our stuff this winter.

Who here doesn’t enjoy prepping the night before? Getting your stuff ready, putting line conditioner on, tying on couple lures, loading up what ya can.

Let’s go fishing.

 

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I'll say I agree with this quote. I love being outdoors and fishing both. If I don't catch fish, I don't worry about it. There will be another day.

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Not at all. You can enjoy nature without fishing. I do. You can be on the water without fishing. I do it. You can collect lures you never plan to throw. I do it. I fish to catch fish. If I wanted to enjoy nature, I'd go on a hike, I'd travel, I'd get out on a pontoon boat, etc. When I'm fishing, I want to catch fish. That's the goal. The nature part is like 4th of July fireworks as an adult - not nearly as exciting, been there, done that, seen that countless times... I go to the 4th festivities for the fun of the festivities, not to see fireworks - just like I fish to catch fish, not to see nature. Nature and fireworks is just a neat benefit, a bonus.

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43 minutes ago, GRiver said:I like everything about fishing, the gear, tackle, ....

I enjoy casting too, the smoothness of the reel as the lure sails towards the target. Watching it hits it’s mark, hoping  for that reaction strike that happens when the lure makes contact with the water. 
Like the tackle too, how many of us are going organize and probably reorganize our stuff this winter.

Who here doesn’t enjoy prepping the night before? Getting your stuff ready, putting line conditioner on, tying on couple lures, loading up what ya can.

Let’s go fishing.

 

Yep....there is a lot more to fishing than catching.

This week is been: rod building, lure making and boat upgrades.

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The quote is a bit bombastic, and people see things differently.

 

Taking in nature and its surroundings has little to do with how I typically fish, which is at night. Everything about it automatically puts me into high gear, even after I've dragged my tired ass off the couch to do it after a long workday. My brain is crackling with anticipation, and I have tunnel vision. Far more time is spent immersed in the second-to-second visualization of what my bait is doing than actually catching a fish, so good for me, I love that part. There's nothing relaxing about it, I'm constantly rev'd up which is why I do this, so perhaps it would be better said that I love the energy of the entire process. Catching a fish is the holeshot, then the blast down the track. I have responsibilities now, and really can't do that anymore, but night fishing gives me that rush. Even the quieter parts of it.

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It's all one big picture, as far as I'm concerned. I don't fret when things get blurry, just push myself harder to clear the way. And if that doesn't work and if at the end of the day I show up empty handed, then no biggie. There's always a next time. And that next time, or even that next cast, is always the thrill that keeps the picture alive.  

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11 hours ago, PressuredFishing said:

Well, I find alot of fun in the equipment; tackle, lures, and the environment, but lots of the urban parts of SOCAL are trashy, unsafe/dangerous, and you are around alot of people that aren't kind. So sometimes I just go fishing in terrible areas just to catch fish, and when I don't it's not a great day

 

Maybe I'll move to a more rural state or clean state that doesn't have human fecalmatter around every block and  homeless bathing in lakes.

 

 

If I fished where you fish, I would feel the same way. Heck, I don't think I'd even fish because I'd have to fish with two swivels: my Whopper Plopper on a swivel and my head on a swivel.

 

But if you fished where I fish, where there are beavers, eagles, ospreys, loons, geese, kingfishers, and no other people, you might be happy paddling and not catching.  

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15 minutes ago, ol'crickety said:

 

 

If I fished where you fish, I would feel the same way. Heck, I don't think I'd even fish because I'd have to fish with two swivels: my Whopper Plopper on a swivel and my head on a swivel.

 

But if you fished where I fish, where there are beavers, eagles, ospreys, loons, geese, kingfishers, and no other people, you might be happy paddling and not catching.  

I saw all those creatures (minus the Osprey, they head south in late November) yesterday in a crowded city full of people haha. Geese by the hundreds and the waterfowl hunters were one step behind 

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48 minutes ago, TnRiver46 said:

I saw all those creatures (minus the Osprey, they head south in late November) yesterday in a crowded city full of people haha. Geese by the hundreds and the waterfowl hunters were one step behind 

Yeah, I'm about 20 minutes (depending on traffic) south of DC, and it's like an episode of Wild Kingdom (someone explain it to the kids) nearly every time I'm out, and sometimes out my back window...

 

IMG951580.jpg

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The rush and elation of catching a big Bass is a strong narcotic, the more you catch, the more you want of it.   

 

I let my addiction get in the way of nature many times.   I'm out there for the thrill of catching an Apex predator, but I never fail to appreciate the unique opportunity I'm blessed with by being on the water, and immersed in nature.

 

I don't have to catch Bass, but I need something to pull on my line occasionally to feel like I'm not just a pleasure crafter.

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As I’ve gotten older, getting skunked doesn’t bother me as much.  I enjoy exploring new water more and trying new things which isn’t always productive.

 

What kills me is loosing a good fish.  I might need therapy if I loose one over 7lbs.

 

 

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I enjoy being on the water, but I wouldn't put all the effort I do into studying the fish and how to catch them if I didn't want to catch them every time I went. That's why there's such a sense of relief when that first fish reaches the boat, the ultimate goal has been achieved. 

 

Thankfully, the more I go and the harder I work, the fewer of those trips I have that end up with me just enjoying nature and the fresh air. 

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There's a lot I love about the whole fishing experience.   But much of it is greatly diminished if I'm not catching.  My wife will tell you that I am not generally a relaxed, happy person when I come home with a skunk or a near skunk...or a bottom half tournament finish.  I do focus a lot of that less than positive energy on what I might have done better/different....as opposed to just being grumpy.   And I'd rather be on the water struggling to catch than off the water.  There's only been a few trips, usually involving gusty winds, where I come off and wish I hadn't gone out at all.

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I often launch my canoe at first light in the morning. It's a great experience to be there when things are just waking up. The fog lifting off the water, no crowds to contend with etc.                               It's a good time to just be out there.

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23 minutes ago, Bluebasser86 said:

I enjoy being on the water, but I wouldn't put all the effort I do into studying the fish and how to catch them if I didn't want to catch them every time I went. That's why there's such a sense of relief when that first fish reaches the boat, the ultimate goal has been achieved. 

 

Thankfully, the more I go and the harder I work, the fewer of those trips I have that end up with me just enjoying nature and the fresh air. 

Yeah that's a huge deal for me.   I need to see that first fish come on board, then things lighten up a bit.   

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1 hour ago, ol'crickety said:

where I fish, where there are beavers, eagles, ospreys, loons, geese, kingfishers,


I love seeing wildlife when I’m fishing, it’s one of the bonuses of this sport. But there is something about the loon specifically, that when I see one I know I’m where I belong. 

34 minutes ago, AlabamaSpothunter said:

The rush and elation of catching a big Bass is a strong narcotic, the more you catch, the more you want of it.


Truer words have never been spoken. 

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4 hours ago, Deleted account said:

Yeah, that's the random reward thing that makes gambling so alluring as well, we are hardwired for it. If we caught fish easily every time, we'd get bored with it. There was a pier in Norfolk, where you could go at night and catch striped bass every cast for hours, it quickly lost it's appeal except for a quick fix.

I think the opposite is also true.  there is a reason we dont fish dead lakes.  if I knew I wasn't gonna catch a fish at all, I wouldn't go.    its why we have our favorite lakes, and lakes we dream about fishing.  it is to catch that dang fish.  the original quote is too narrow.  there are been some great responses.  the gear, the prep, the study of the prey, etc.  great responses.  

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"That would work if ‘harvesting fish’ and ‘catching fish’ were one and the same thing to you "

 

Oh jeez. You know, a fish on the hook. A fish in the boat or on the bank or lipped in your hand. We could split hairs here, but I don't think too many fish around here have hairs.

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